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Finding Balance

Becoming a mom is a wonderful experience (of course!), but between working, cleaning, and caring for your baby, it can also be time-consuming. Huggies has some quick, easy ways to help give you a break.


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baby laughing

7 Tips for Surviving a Road Trip with Young Children

Last night my family of six rolled back into town, surviving a 20 hour (one way) road trip to sunny Florida all the way from gloomy Indiana. It’s a trip I’ve personally taken yearly since I was a small girl, and over the years it’s become a tradition my husband and I have passed down to our family. The only “negative” is that because of our family size and the cost of airline flights, we must drive instead of fly.

And while it’s a marathon of a drive, I don’t really dread it. In fact, with a little prep and planning, it can be actually fun! We manage just fine, because I always come armed with an arsenal of tips and tricks up my sleeve.

A few tricks I use when road tripping with my small children:

  1. Leave before the sun rises.
  2. I’ve found it makes the trip feel shorter if we can get a few hours down the road before anyone is begging for snacks, needs entertainment, or has to go potty.

  3. Pack lots of fresh fruit.
  4. For us, avoiding the junk food keeps the sugar highs (and lows) at bay. A 2 year old on a sugar binge strapped in a car seat? No thank you.

  5. Break up the drive and spend the night at a hotel that has a pool, if possible.
  6. After riding in the car all day, it can be hard to wind down to go to bed, especially in an unfamiliar environment. Swimming in a pool for a bit before bedtime is an awesome way to have some fun and get the wiggles out.

  7. Install passenger-side car shades.
  8. Nothing’s worse than a tired baby that can’t nap on the road because the sun is either in his eyes, or the heat is getting to him. Our minivan came with pre-installed shades we can easily pull up when needed, but similar type shades can also be inexpensively be purchased and installed as well.

  9. Take frequent short breaks.
  10. In the long run, I’ve found it keeps moral high to spend the extra 5 minutes at the rest stop, letting the little ones crawl around in the grass for a few minutes getting some much needed physical activity.

  11. Anticipate traffic jams.
  12. Before I leave town, I do my research and figure out where the construction is, and at what mile markers we might delayed. By knowing where on the map to anticipate traffic jams, I can make sure we have a full gas tank and happy bellies. Oh, and that everyone is properly pottied and diapered.

  13. Relax, and go with the (traffic) flow.
  14. While road trips can be super fun, there’s also a high probability that not everyone will be happy at all times. It’s OK to let the “crabbies” run their course, because this too shall pass (somewhere farther down the road).

How about you? Do you have any go-to travel road trip tips or tricks?

Image: DisneyBaby


Five Fabulous Warm Weather Activities for Dad and Baby

Flowers are budding and new green leaves are sprouting on trees, sure signs that the weather is turning warmer and summer is right around the corner.  Springtime is the perfect time to start taking your baby for outside excursions and activities. For dads, that can mean special bonding time while enjoying nature and exploring new sights and sounds for baby.  We’ve got five ideas for daddy-baby warm weather fun.

Take a Hike

With a special hiking backpack made for safely transporting baby you can walk a local, easy level hiking trail.  Be sure to pack extra diapers, sunscreen, food and bottles so that you’re prepared for the length of the hike. Stop often to point out new and interesting fauna and flora to your baby.

Make Baby Part of Your Workout

Jogging strollers allow you to take baby out for a run. Babies love the speed and you’ll love the company. Pick a scenic path through a park or along the beach so baby can enjoy the scenery. Pack a picnic blanket in the stroller basket so you can end your run with some relaxing one-on-one time while lounging on the grass.

Shop Your Local Farmer’s Market

Once the weather turns warm your local farmer’s market will be overflowing with fresh produce, flowers and home baked goods.  Your baby will delight in looking at all of the brightly colored fruits and vegetables, smelling the flowers and being a part of the lively shopping experience.  Visiting a farmers market is a great way to expose your baby to new foods, sights and smells, while spending quality time with them.

Get in the Water

Signing up for a daddy/baby swim class at a local pool can be a safe and enjoyable way to introduce your baby to the water, and teach you methods for engaging with your baby in the water. Don’t forget the sunscreen if you’re outside, and swim diapers are a must.  An added benefit of signing up for a regular swim class is that you will meet other dads and expand your dad community.

Get Your Groove On

Outdoor concerts are a fantastic way to listen to music with your baby.  Check local parenting group list serves or your local papers for event listings and seek out family friendly bands playing near you in a local parks, outdoor theaters and other al fresco venues.  Dancing with your baby, or just relaxing together while listening to songs, is a great way to spend an hour. And the best part of an outdoor concert is that if you’re baby starts to get fussy you can easily pack up and leave – or put them down for a nap in their stroller.

No matter how you choose to spend time outdoors with your baby, the most important thing is that you are making the most of the wonderful weather, together.  Enjoy it!

Image : Getty


What to do during your Spring Staycation

Everyone feels like celebrating when the weather starts to warm up. But even though many people may take a holiday vacation at this time, not everyone has the luxury of being able to take off for an extended spring break trip. So if you’re not going to be jetting away to some exotic locale—no worries! What matters most is quality time with your little ones, family and friends. Here are some fun ideas to help you celebrate springtime a little closer to home.

Swim in the hotel pool.

Even if you’re not traveling, you can still experience the favorite part of every toddler’s vacation—swimming in the pool—without paying for an expensive hotel stay and meals. Many upscale city hotels and country resorts offer reasonably priced day passes that are made for people who just want to use the pool facilities and skip the overnight stay. With just a little research, you could find the perfect spot for a hotel pool getaway near you. Have worry-free water play with Huggies Little Swimmers disposable swim pants , now with your child’s favorite characters.

Go on a baby animal safari.

Springtime means babies in the animal world. Head to your local zoo, or a farm or nature center, and spend the day exploring to see if you can spot any newborns. Load up a backpack with safari gear such as binoculars, a magnifying glass and a mini notebook and colored pencils for drawing. Point out interesting animal behaviors to your little one and compare and contrast the care the baby animals receive to how you took care of your child when he was a baby.

Get your hands dirty.

If weather allows, get in the dirt outside and plant something. Playing with dirt and mud is a great hands-on sensory activity for toddlers. You can also do this activity indoors by planting seeds in pots and talking about how plants grow. By checking the pots every day, you and your toddler can watch the entire life cycle of a plant unfold, by watching the seed develop into a seedling and eventually an adult plant.

Host a “springathon” playdate.

Reach out to other moms and parents and invite them and their little ones to an extended playdate. After playing outdoors, serve up a simple spring-themed lunch by using flower shaped cookie cutters to make a variety of sandwiches, then serve up a salad of spring greens and help the kids make their own flower pot dessert. Wrap things up with a story time activity, featuring spring-themed books read by the parents in the group.

Make a bird feeder.

Early spring is actually a great time to feed the birds in your neighborhood because there aren’t many natural seed sources available for them at this time. And don’t worry, making your bird feeder doesn’t have to involve using a hammer, nails and wood. There are lots of toddler-friendly ideas available online that require little more than birdseed, twine and peanut butter or vegetable shortening.  You can use empty toilet paper rolls, pinecones and even hollowed out orange rinds to create your birdfeeder and have lots of springtime fun. 

Image : Getty

little girl at the pool

Taking Your Baby In The Pool: It’s A Good Thing!

You get wet one-on-one time.

Once the umbilical cord falls off, you can take a newborn in a pool, as long as it’s heated. Hanging out there can be super-soothing. Cradle baby against your chest, one hand supporting the back of her neck, and slowly wade through the water. Once she can hold up her head, grab her under the armpits and keep her facing you. No cell phones, no chores—just a chance to gaze into your baby’s eyes. "Parents often tell me that pool time is the only opportunity they have to spend thirty pleasurable, uninterrupted minutes with their child,” says Jenny McCuiston, a mother of two and owner of Goldfish Swim School in Birmingham, Michigan.

Your baby gets stronger.

By the time your kiddo is about 6 months old, you can do mommy-and-me classes. “They help babies increase their strength, coordination, and balance, beneficial for crawling and walking,” says McCuiston. And they’ll probably like it more than tummy time (but keep up with that, too!

Your baby stays safer.

Kids who are introduced to water early on are at lower risk for accidents later in life, even in deep water. At Infant Swimming Resource, in Charleston, South Carolina, Rebecca Bentz, a mother of two, teaches babies as young as 6 months how to flip onto their backs and float. Lessons or no, the same rules apply: Never let your baby out of your sight for a second near water.

Your baby gains confidence.

Your baby will adore how easy it is to move in the water, which will pump up her sense of independence—and inspire her to motor around outside the water, too. Bonus: Splashing around in the water takes so much energy, she’ll eat like an Olympic champ and sleep like a...well, you know.

Image: Getty


10 Fun Books to Read to Baby

Your baby should be read to from birth.

That’s the advice that new and expectant moms across the country are receiving from their pediatricians and other child development experts.

Of course, this recommendation is not about getting your little one to read chapter books before her first birthday. It’s based on brain development research and the critical importance of the experiences your child has during her first three years of life.

Read to your baby now and you will help her build the literacy, language, social and emotional skills that she needs to succeed in school. Plus, snuggling up together to read a book is also great for bonding.

So what should you read to your little love? Newborns are often soothed by the rhythm of nursery rhymes and lullabies, so you might want to put those books at the top of your list. It’s also helpful to know that really young babies will have an easier time seeing books with high-contrast illustrations.

Here are some suggestions to help you start creating the ultimate library checklist for books to read to your baby.

Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox

This padded board book features rhyme and repetition. The book’s illustrations highlight culturally diverse babies and the rhyming text celebrates the ten little fingers and toes that they all have in common.

Black on White  by Tana Hoban

Designed for infants’ underdeveloped eyes, this book features high-contrast black illustrations on a white background. The book is wordless, which allows you to identify the familiar solid and patterned shapes for baby.

Fuzzy Fuzzy Fuzzy! by Sandra Boyton

A touch and feel board book that delivers a multisensory experience for your little one. Each colorful illustration of a farm animal features a different texture to touch and brief text that describes what is being felt.

Global Babies by The Global Fund for Children

This board book features close-up pictures of babies from around the world. Represented countries include Guatemala, Thailand, Greenland, Mali, U.S.A., India, South Africa, Fiji, Peru, Afghanistan, Malawi, Spain, Iraq, Rwanda, and Bhutan.

Who Flies Cat the Cat?by Mo Willems

A cat introduces her flying animal friends in this rhyming book from the Cat the Cat series. Repetition, colorful art and minimal text make it a natural pick for babies.

Peekaboo Bedtime by Rachel Isadora

This illustrated picture book is all about a toddler's evening at home. The story features a little boy who goes outside to look at the moon with his family and then returns inside to have a snack, take a bath and hear a story.

¡Pío Peep!: Traditional Spanish Nursery Rhymes: by Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy

This book features twenty-nine nursery rhymes that celebrate Spanish and Latin American heritage. Bilingual rhymes are presented in both Spanish and English and are accompanied by adorable illustrations.

Where is Baby’s Bellybutton?: by Karen Katz

This is an interactive board book that is all about babies playing peekaboo. Lifting the flaps to search for baby hands, toes and belly buttons adds to the fun of reading this book with your little one.

Color Zoo: by Lois Ehlert

Your baby will love the animals and shapes found in this unique board book. With every turn of the page, your little one will see one vibrantly colorful animal transformed into another.

Baby Animal Farm: by Karen Blair

Five little toddlers head off to visit a baby animal farm. They see ducklings, chicks, a lamb and other farm friends. Have fun making the animal noises for baby as you read her this infant-friendly board book.

Image: Getty


How to Take Great Pics of Baby’s Movement Milestones

Your baby will experience so many amazing movement milestones during her first year. There’s a lot of action that takes place in between the first time she rolls over to the day she starts walking on her own! And capturing those precise moments in pictures can sometimes be challenging.

“The more active your baby is, the more patient you have to be to capture those movement milestones,” says Lisa Turner a professional children’s and baby photographer in Denver, Colorado. “It might take 50 to 100 shots to get one picture that is fantastic.”

The good news is that you don’t need to invest in a super-expensive camera, whatever you’re willing to use on a regular basis will do. Here are the tips you need to take amazing pictures of your baby’s precious movement milestones.

Focus on light.

Proper lighting is essential.This is especially true when using a smartphone. You can’t manually adjust the shutter speed on a smartphone camera, but those adjustments do happen automatically based on the amount of available light. “A dark setting is going to give you a slow shutter speed, which will make your picture turn out blurry,” says Turner. “Having ample light allows you to capture baby’s action and freeze it.” Natural light is best, so head outdoors with baby or find a room with north-facing windows for consistent, even light.

Move in closer.

If your cutie is walking, you’re going to want to capture more than just a little speck standing solo in the backyard. To really photograph the action, get in close. Try engaging with your little one to capture natural expressions. Enlist an older sibling to serve as your official photographer’s assistant and have her playfully talk to your little one while you snap the fabulous pics.

Use angles to your advantage.

Is your sweet pea rolling over and picking up her head, but not sitting up yet? For best results, put a blanket down and stand over baby so that you can shoot pictures of her from above. If you’ve got a crawler, position her far enough away so that she can crawl toward you and you can take pictures of her in action. Try getting down low for an angle that will allow you to photograph baby’s face as she moves toward you.

Consider your timing.

There are certain times of day that offer ideal lighting conditions for taking great pictures of your little one’s movements. If you can, shoot your pictures first thing in the morning for some of the most pleasing light. Another great option is the last hour before sunset, which professional photographers often refer to as “the golden hour” because of the gorgeous and hazy golden light that is given off by the setting sun. If these two options don't work with baby’s schedule, pick a shady spot outdoors at any time of day.

Finish with an app.

Once all of your fabulous pictures have been taken, you can create a keepsake scrapbook of baby’s movement milestones. Before you print, do a quick search on editing apps so that you can add some finishing touches to your pics. Many apps offer filter options, cropping features, blurring tools, and more that will make your pictures look as if they where shot by a pro.


girl toddler in playroom

Transitional Playroom Design: Ideas That Grow With Your Child

Creating a bedroom or playroom that grows as baby develops can be a life saver for mom and dad. As you plan a living space for your little one, incorporating long-term furniture pieces, timeless decor, and items that encourage development will all help you not only stretch your decorating dollars — but build a space baby will love for many years to come.

Creating the perfect playroom for your baby can seem daunting. Color schemes, furniture, decor — where do you start? We talked to design experts about how to create a long-lasting bedroom or playroom for your child that will withstand the transition from baby to toddler years, and even beyond.

Think ahead

When mapping out your new baby’s living space, consider designs you love. “Design (the room) in a way you will enjoy and that will soothe you,” says Sherri Blum Schuchart of Jack and Jill Interiors Inc. ( “In several years, your baby will have an opinion and should definitely have a say in how the room transitions into a room he or she can be proud of, and that reflects his or her individual style.” But right now, your baby only needs a few things: love, safety, food, and comfort. You’ll be spending countless hours feeding and loving the baby in the nursery and playroom, so make sure the design and decor feel right for you.

Designs that grow

“Arrows, Aztec patterns, and woodlands animals, (foxes, squirrels, and raccoons) are today’s hottest trends for boys and girls,” says Blum Schuchart. “These themes, if not too ‘cartoony,’ can transition easily from toddlerhood playroom to teen hangout.”

Transitional elements

  1. Convertible crib
  2. “Consider buying a convertible crib rather than a traditional crib that serves no purpose for the child once they outgrow the crib stage,” suggests Blum Schuchart. “There are dozens of convertible cribs on the market today that transition from crib to toddler bed, and even later into full-size bed. This saves parents from needing to buy a completely new piece of furniture in the future.”

    When shopping for your crib, be sure to first do your research and check for current crib safety standards.

  3. Dresser
  4. Instead of a changing table, consider securing a changing pad to the top of a dresser or in the main opening of a media center. These furniture pieces will long outlive a changing table, and can be used down the road to house toys, clothes, and more.

  5. Shelves and open bookcases
  6. Safely securing shelves and open bookcases in your child’s play space will give you a place to stow toys and baby supplies now — and a spot that later can house your child’s favorite books, stuffed animals, clothes, or knickknacks.

  7. Armchair
  8. Instead of a nursing glider, look for a comfy, padded armchair. A solid, timeless chair silhouette can be reupholstered as your baby grows to fit her developing and evolving style.

Image: Thinkstock


Getting Ready for a New Baby Sibling

Got a baby on the way — and not sure how your firstborn will handle it? Here’s how to prep kids for a new sibling.

You might be well-prepared for the arrival of a new baby in the house, but your firstborn has no idea how the changes to come. You can help her prep for a new baby and a brand-new life as a big sibling with these simple games and strategies. They can simultaneously head off feelings of jealousy and resentment, send a message that you’ll love your child just as much as always and get her excited about meeting the new baby.

Head, Shoulders Knees and Toes

Your firstborn will probably find a brand-new sibling really wrinkly and odd-looking. To help manage expectations, pull out some photos of your toddler when she was a newborn. And give the lowdown on some of the things that make infants different from toddlers. For example:

  • Belly buttons: Newborns have an umbilical stump attached to their belly button for a few weeks.
  • Scrunched-up legs: Their legs are scrunched up from all that time spent tucked inside Mommy’s tummy.
  • Floppy necks: Their necks are floppy, and it’ll be awhile before the new baby’s neck is strong enough to support her giant head.
  • Soft spots: New babies have delicate soft spots in their skulls (which is one reason to be extra gentle with her head).

You can also pull out one of the teeny-tiny outfits she wore so she gets a sense of how small she once was.

Burp the Baby

Help your child grasp the concept that newborns don’t actually eat anything at all — they just drink. Tell your child that babies grow from drinking special milk straight from your breasts, or from a bottle that you (or your partner or caregiver) prepare. For fun, demonstrate how to burp a baby by practicing on your tot, who is bound to get a kick out of sitting in your lap and making a great big pretend burp.

The Crying Game

Explain to your child that unlike big kids, a new baby doesn’t know how to tell anyone what he wants or what’s bothering him, so he cries — it’s his way of talking. He might be letting the family know he’s hungry or sleepy, too hot or too cold, that his diaper is dirty, or he’s just plain bored. Together, come up with a list of things your firstborn often asks for, and then have her try to get her message across without using words. Your child will quickly see how hard it might be for a new baby sibling.

Golden Slumbers

It’s hard to believe how much an infant sleeps—especially if you’re a toddler or preschooler who’d rather do anything but lie still in bed. Explain that growing big and strong like her is hard work and that little babies sleep in spurts because they need to eat often. Once your firstborn understands that a new baby sibling needs plenty of shut-eye in order to grow, she’s likely to be more patient and cooperative about your infant's sleep habits. Together make a list of quiet activities she can do with you while the new baby in the house naps.

Snuggle Time

Prepare your child for the fact that you’re going to have to hold the new baby a lot at first. It can be tough for your firstborn to find your arms — and lap — occupied by the new baby all the time. But once you explain why babies need to be held so much, she just might cut you (and the baby) some slack. Hold your child and ask how the rocking motion makes her feel, and then explain that cuddling makes newborns happy because it reminds them of being inside your tummy. Then ask your child to snuggle her stuffed animal so she feels like a rock star, too. And remind your little one that there will still be plenty of hugs for her, too.

Practice Runs

Your firstborn might not be up for a daily list of baby-related chores, but she’s bound to want to lend a little hand as the big sibling — especially if you make her feel like she’s doing something important. Go ahead and promote her to Big Sibling Baby Helper and encourage her to help as much as she’d like. You can do some practice runs before the baby’s arrival. Using a doll as a stand-in, have your child fetch you a diaper or wipes at changing time, a towel at bath time, a pacifier when the “baby” is crying. Rehearse silly songs and funny faces. Both will come in handy when a cranky sibling needs some distraction. Explain that some tasks, such as rocking and feeding, will be performed only by grown-ups, but that she’ll be able to take full charge of a doll’s (or stuffed animal’s) care.

Playtime Rehearsal

Your child might expect a new baby sibling to be ready for action right out of the gate, so it’s a good idea to paint a realistic picture of what life with a newborn baby will be like. Explain that babies don’t do much more than eat, sleep, cry and poop or pee at first, and that they can’t be much of a playmate right away. If you have any video footage of your older child as a newborn, use it to illustrate this point. Together, try out some fun activities to play with baby from day one, such as:

  • Singing or dancing for the new sibling
  • Offering a finger for the baby to squeeze
  • Chatting the baby up using different voices
  • Holding a soft toy for the baby to look at

Tell your firstborn that there’s nothing newborns like more than a human face, especially when it belongs to the best big sibling in the world.

The Art of Being Gentle

Your child may not realize how important it is to be gentle with newborn babies. Explain that babies need a very gentle touch because they’re still so little and not as strong as big kids like her. Have your child practice being gentle with a doll, holding it on her lap and stroking it softly like she’ll soon be doing with the new baby brother. Ask your little one to stroke your arm gently too and say things like, “Gentle feels good! The baby will love when you’re gentle.” Point out areas that your firstborn will have to be especially careful with, like the baby’s eyes, the soft spot on his head, and his nose, ears and mouth.

Handle Gifts with Care

Welcoming a new baby to the house means plenty of presents, and that can be tough for a tot who’s hoping those pretty packages are for her. Before they start to pile up, explain to your child that friends and family want to help celebrate this happy time by giving gifts. Then go to your little one’s room and point out a few presents she got as a baby. You can also practice gracious sibling etiquette by rehearsing what might happen when people come bearing gifts. For example, the baby can’t open them, so he’ll need his big sibling to be a special helper and open his gifts for him. To help your tot get in on the celebrating, plan a gift she can give her new baby sibling, like a painting or drawing to hang near his crib. And don’t forget to give her an “I’m a big sibling” gift when the baby is born.



Out on the Town With a Baby or Two

Adding a baby (or two) to the family mix means having a strategy for dining out. These tips will help make things fun for everyone.


    Call ahead.

    This one step can make the difference between a fun night out and a “never again” experience. Make a reservation if possible, ask when the restaurant is least busy (breakfast and lunch are likely options), and make sure you can get a high chair. Are you getting a chilly response from the host? Don’t fight it — instead, find another spot where you’ll feel welcome.

    Be prepared.

    Don’t leave home without a fully stocked diaper bag! Bring a sufficient supply of Huggies Diapers and Huggies Wipes. Bring a bib or two or three, books and other quiet distractions, a sippy cup and snacks (just in case).

    Ask for an out-of-the-way table.

    A table that’s in a quiet corner gives you some privacy if you have to nurse and gives other guests a wide berth. That said, if you’re at a restaurant that features a show or kid-friendly entertainment, be sure to get a front row seat.

    Ask for baby’s food to be served immediately.

    Get your little one set up first to avoid fussiness. And don’t be shy about asking for baby-friendly foods that aren't on the menu, such as plain steamed veggies or a fruit plate.

    Clean up after your little one.

    If the area around where baby was stationed resembles a warzone, ask your waitperson for some napkins or a dustpan so that you can do some cleaning up. The waiter may demur, but your simple offer will make you a welcome return customer.



    Long, leisurely meals? Save those for date night when baby’s at home with a sitter. Don’t rush, but keep things moving. The less time you spend ordering, sipping your drink, and checking the bill, the better your chances of enjoying a meltdown-free experience.

    Forget your fellow diners.

    If your baby starts to fuss, take him out of the dining room until he calms down. Have your partner stroll with baby for a bit while you finish eating and then switch off. Or get your food to go and finish up at home (where you can still enjoy your meal and a clean kitchen!).


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