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Getting your little one to sleep like a baby can be a lot easier said than done. Huggies has compiled articles, advice and answers on how to get both you and your newborn snoozing soundly.

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Small Talk: Making "Conversation" with Your Baby

You know your baby has a lot to tell you, but what? You may not always be able to figure it out, but there are ways you can help your baby build her verbal skills.

Yada, yada, yada at her

It may seem like your baby doesn’t know what you’re saying, but she’s been listening to the different tones of your voice since before she was born. Babies know the difference between happy and stressed talk, and they soak up what they hear like little sponges. And after about 18 months, all she’s heard you say will start pouring out! Talk to her about what you’re doing as you do it, and leave space for her to respond. "We’re going to take a stroller ride now. What do you think about that?"

"Monkey see, monkey do"

Mimic his every movement and expression. If he turns his head to the side, turn yours, too. Give him your best rendition of his goos and bah-bahs. You’ll capture his attention, even if the exchange is short.

Exaggerate everything.

Make your voice squeaky, open your eyes wide and raise your eyebrows. Speak slowly, drawing out your sounds at the end of words: "Are you my bayyy-beee? Oh, yes you a-r-r-e!"

Work the classics

"Peekaboo," "This Little Piggy Went to Market" and "I’m going to tickle your tummy!" work (almost) every time.

Try signing

In the months before they begin mastering words, most babies can learn how to use basic baby hand signs for "milk," "more" and other everyday words.

Lean in Remember, for the first six months, babies are nearsighted. Whatever method of communication you choose, move in close so you’re about 6-12 inches from his face.

And of course, the best time to carry on a conversation with your baby is when she’s rested, well-fed and has an alert and ready expression on her face. Turning her head from side to side or looking away means she’s hungry, tired or plain had enough.

Sandy & Marcie Jones are the authors of Great Expectations: Baby’s First Year. Order your copy from Barnes & Noble

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little girl at the pool

Taking Your Baby In The Pool: It’s A Good Thing!

You get wet one-on-one time.

Once the umbilical cord falls off, you can take a newborn in a pool, as long as it’s heated. Hanging out there can be super-soothing. Cradle baby against your chest, one hand supporting the back of her neck, and slowly wade through the water. Once she can hold up her head, grab her under the armpits and keep her facing you. No cell phones, no chores—just a chance to gaze into your baby’s eyes. "Parents often tell me that pool time is the only opportunity they have to spend thirty pleasurable, uninterrupted minutes with their child,” says Jenny McCuiston, a mother of two and owner of Goldfish Swim School in Birmingham, Michigan.

Your baby gets stronger.

By the time your kiddo is about 6 months old, you can do mommy-and-me classes. “They help babies increase their strength, coordination, and balance, beneficial for crawling and walking,” says McCuiston. And they’ll probably like it more than tummy time (but keep up with that, too!

Your baby stays safer.

Kids who are introduced to water early on are at lower risk for accidents later in life, even in deep water. At Infant Swimming Resource, in Charleston, South Carolina, Rebecca Bentz, a mother of two, teaches babies as young as 6 months how to flip onto their backs and float. Lessons or no, the same rules apply: Never let your baby out of your sight for a second near water.

Your baby gains confidence.

Your baby will adore how easy it is to move in the water, which will pump up her sense of independence—and inspire her to motor around outside the water, too. Bonus: Splashing around in the water takes so much energy, she’ll eat like an Olympic champ and sleep like a...well, you know.

Image: Getty

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10 Fun Books to Read to Baby

Your baby should be read to from birth.

That’s the advice that new and expectant moms across the country are receiving from their pediatricians and other child development experts.

Of course, this recommendation is not about getting your little one to read chapter books before her first birthday. It’s based on brain development research and the critical importance of the experiences your child has during her first three years of life.

Read to your baby now and you will help her build the literacy, language, social and emotional skills that she needs to succeed in school. Plus, snuggling up together to read a book is also great for bonding.

So what should you read to your little love? Newborns are often soothed by the rhythm of nursery rhymes and lullabies, so you might want to put those books at the top of your list. It’s also helpful to know that really young babies will have an easier time seeing books with high-contrast illustrations.

Here are some suggestions to help you start creating the ultimate library checklist for books to read to your baby.

Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox

This padded board book features rhyme and repetition. The book’s illustrations highlight culturally diverse babies and the rhyming text celebrates the ten little fingers and toes that they all have in common.

Black on White  by Tana Hoban

Designed for infants’ underdeveloped eyes, this book features high-contrast black illustrations on a white background. The book is wordless, which allows you to identify the familiar solid and patterned shapes for baby.

Fuzzy Fuzzy Fuzzy! by Sandra Boyton

A touch and feel board book that delivers a multisensory experience for your little one. Each colorful illustration of a farm animal features a different texture to touch and brief text that describes what is being felt.

Global Babies by The Global Fund for Children

This board book features close-up pictures of babies from around the world. Represented countries include Guatemala, Thailand, Greenland, Mali, U.S.A., India, South Africa, Fiji, Peru, Afghanistan, Malawi, Spain, Iraq, Rwanda, and Bhutan.

Who Flies Cat the Cat?by Mo Willems

A cat introduces her flying animal friends in this rhyming book from the Cat the Cat series. Repetition, colorful art and minimal text make it a natural pick for babies.

Peekaboo Bedtime by Rachel Isadora

This illustrated picture book is all about a toddler's evening at home. The story features a little boy who goes outside to look at the moon with his family and then returns inside to have a snack, take a bath and hear a story.

¡Pío Peep!: Traditional Spanish Nursery Rhymes: by Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy

This book features twenty-nine nursery rhymes that celebrate Spanish and Latin American heritage. Bilingual rhymes are presented in both Spanish and English and are accompanied by adorable illustrations.

Where is Baby’s Bellybutton?: by Karen Katz

This is an interactive board book that is all about babies playing peekaboo. Lifting the flaps to search for baby hands, toes and belly buttons adds to the fun of reading this book with your little one.

Color Zoo: by Lois Ehlert

Your baby will love the animals and shapes found in this unique board book. With every turn of the page, your little one will see one vibrantly colorful animal transformed into another.

Baby Animal Farm: by Karen Blair

Five little toddlers head off to visit a baby animal farm. They see ducklings, chicks, a lamb and other farm friends. Have fun making the animal noises for baby as you read her this infant-friendly board book.

Image: Getty

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How to Take Great Pics of Baby’s Movement Milestones

Your baby will experience so many amazing movement milestones during her first year. There’s a lot of action that takes place in between the first time she rolls over to the day she starts walking on her own! And capturing those precise moments in pictures can sometimes be challenging.

“The more active your baby is, the more patient you have to be to capture those movement milestones,” says Lisa Turner a professional children’s and baby photographer in Denver, Colorado. “It might take 50 to 100 shots to get one picture that is fantastic.”

The good news is that you don’t need to invest in a super-expensive camera, whatever you’re willing to use on a regular basis will do. Here are the tips you need to take amazing pictures of your baby’s precious movement milestones.

Focus on light.

Proper lighting is essential.This is especially true when using a smartphone. You can’t manually adjust the shutter speed on a smartphone camera, but those adjustments do happen automatically based on the amount of available light. “A dark setting is going to give you a slow shutter speed, which will make your picture turn out blurry,” says Turner. “Having ample light allows you to capture baby’s action and freeze it.” Natural light is best, so head outdoors with baby or find a room with north-facing windows for consistent, even light.

Move in closer.

If your cutie is walking, you’re going to want to capture more than just a little speck standing solo in the backyard. To really photograph the action, get in close. Try engaging with your little one to capture natural expressions. Enlist an older sibling to serve as your official photographer’s assistant and have her playfully talk to your little one while you snap the fabulous pics.

Use angles to your advantage.

Is your sweet pea rolling over and picking up her head, but not sitting up yet? For best results, put a blanket down and stand over baby so that you can shoot pictures of her from above. If you’ve got a crawler, position her far enough away so that she can crawl toward you and you can take pictures of her in action. Try getting down low for an angle that will allow you to photograph baby’s face as she moves toward you.

Consider your timing.

There are certain times of day that offer ideal lighting conditions for taking great pictures of your little one’s movements. If you can, shoot your pictures first thing in the morning for some of the most pleasing light. Another great option is the last hour before sunset, which professional photographers often refer to as “the golden hour” because of the gorgeous and hazy golden light that is given off by the setting sun. If these two options don't work with baby’s schedule, pick a shady spot outdoors at any time of day.

Finish with an app.

Once all of your fabulous pictures have been taken, you can create a keepsake scrapbook of baby’s movement milestones. Before you print, do a quick search on editing apps so that you can add some finishing touches to your pics. Many apps offer filter options, cropping features, blurring tools, and more that will make your pictures look as if they where shot by a pro.

Image:Getty

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girl toddler in playroom

Transitional Playroom Design: Ideas That Grow With Your Child

Creating a bedroom or playroom that grows as baby develops can be a life saver for mom and dad. As you plan a living space for your little one, incorporating long-term furniture pieces, timeless decor, and items that encourage development will all help you not only stretch your decorating dollars — but build a space baby will love for many years to come.

Creating the perfect playroom for your baby can seem daunting. Color schemes, furniture, decor — where do you start? We talked to design experts about how to create a long-lasting bedroom or playroom for your child that will withstand the transition from baby to toddler years, and even beyond.

Think ahead

When mapping out your new baby’s living space, consider designs you love. “Design (the room) in a way you will enjoy and that will soothe you,” says Sherri Blum Schuchart of Jack and Jill Interiors Inc. (jackandjillinteriors.com). “In several years, your baby will have an opinion and should definitely have a say in how the room transitions into a room he or she can be proud of, and that reflects his or her individual style.” But right now, your baby only needs a few things: love, safety, food, and comfort. You’ll be spending countless hours feeding and loving the baby in the nursery and playroom, so make sure the design and decor feel right for you.

Designs that grow

“Arrows, Aztec patterns, and woodlands animals, (foxes, squirrels, and raccoons) are today’s hottest trends for boys and girls,” says Blum Schuchart. “These themes, if not too ‘cartoony,’ can transition easily from toddlerhood playroom to teen hangout.”

Transitional elements

  1. Convertible crib
  2. “Consider buying a convertible crib rather than a traditional crib that serves no purpose for the child once they outgrow the crib stage,” suggests Blum Schuchart. “There are dozens of convertible cribs on the market today that transition from crib to toddler bed, and even later into full-size bed. This saves parents from needing to buy a completely new piece of furniture in the future.”

    When shopping for your crib, be sure to first do your research and check for current crib safety standards.

  3. Dresser
  4. Instead of a changing table, consider securing a changing pad to the top of a dresser or in the main opening of a media center. These furniture pieces will long outlive a changing table, and can be used down the road to house toys, clothes, and more.

  5. Shelves and open bookcases
  6. Safely securing shelves and open bookcases in your child’s play space will give you a place to stow toys and baby supplies now — and a spot that later can house your child’s favorite books, stuffed animals, clothes, or knickknacks.

  7. Armchair
  8. Instead of a nursing glider, look for a comfy, padded armchair. A solid, timeless chair silhouette can be reupholstered as your baby grows to fit her developing and evolving style.

Image: Thinkstock

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Getting Ready for a New Baby Sibling

Got a baby on the way — and not sure how your firstborn will handle it? Here’s how to prep kids for a new sibling.

You might be well-prepared for the arrival of a new baby in the house, but your firstborn has no idea how the changes to come. You can help her prep for a new baby and a brand-new life as a big sibling with these simple games and strategies. They can simultaneously head off feelings of jealousy and resentment, send a message that you’ll love your child just as much as always and get her excited about meeting the new baby.

Head, Shoulders Knees and Toes

Your firstborn will probably find a brand-new sibling really wrinkly and odd-looking. To help manage expectations, pull out some photos of your toddler when she was a newborn. And give the lowdown on some of the things that make infants different from toddlers. For example:

  • Belly buttons: Newborns have an umbilical stump attached to their belly button for a few weeks.
  • Scrunched-up legs: Their legs are scrunched up from all that time spent tucked inside Mommy’s tummy.
  • Floppy necks: Their necks are floppy, and it’ll be awhile before the new baby’s neck is strong enough to support her giant head.
  • Soft spots: New babies have delicate soft spots in their skulls (which is one reason to be extra gentle with her head).

You can also pull out one of the teeny-tiny outfits she wore so she gets a sense of how small she once was.

Burp the Baby

Help your child grasp the concept that newborns don’t actually eat anything at all — they just drink. Tell your child that babies grow from drinking special milk straight from your breasts, or from a bottle that you (or your partner or caregiver) prepare. For fun, demonstrate how to burp a baby by practicing on your tot, who is bound to get a kick out of sitting in your lap and making a great big pretend burp.

The Crying Game

Explain to your child that unlike big kids, a new baby doesn’t know how to tell anyone what he wants or what’s bothering him, so he cries — it’s his way of talking. He might be letting the family know he’s hungry or sleepy, too hot or too cold, that his diaper is dirty, or he’s just plain bored. Together, come up with a list of things your firstborn often asks for, and then have her try to get her message across without using words. Your child will quickly see how hard it might be for a new baby sibling.

Golden Slumbers

It’s hard to believe how much an infant sleeps—especially if you’re a toddler or preschooler who’d rather do anything but lie still in bed. Explain that growing big and strong like her is hard work and that little babies sleep in spurts because they need to eat often. Once your firstborn understands that a new baby sibling needs plenty of shut-eye in order to grow, she’s likely to be more patient and cooperative about your infant's sleep habits. Together make a list of quiet activities she can do with you while the new baby in the house naps.

Snuggle Time

Prepare your child for the fact that you’re going to have to hold the new baby a lot at first. It can be tough for your firstborn to find your arms — and lap — occupied by the new baby all the time. But once you explain why babies need to be held so much, she just might cut you (and the baby) some slack. Hold your child and ask how the rocking motion makes her feel, and then explain that cuddling makes newborns happy because it reminds them of being inside your tummy. Then ask your child to snuggle her stuffed animal so she feels like a rock star, too. And remind your little one that there will still be plenty of hugs for her, too.

Practice Runs

Your firstborn might not be up for a daily list of baby-related chores, but she’s bound to want to lend a little hand as the big sibling — especially if you make her feel like she’s doing something important. Go ahead and promote her to Big Sibling Baby Helper and encourage her to help as much as she’d like. You can do some practice runs before the baby’s arrival. Using a doll as a stand-in, have your child fetch you a diaper or wipes at changing time, a towel at bath time, a pacifier when the “baby” is crying. Rehearse silly songs and funny faces. Both will come in handy when a cranky sibling needs some distraction. Explain that some tasks, such as rocking and feeding, will be performed only by grown-ups, but that she’ll be able to take full charge of a doll’s (or stuffed animal’s) care.

Playtime Rehearsal

Your child might expect a new baby sibling to be ready for action right out of the gate, so it’s a good idea to paint a realistic picture of what life with a newborn baby will be like. Explain that babies don’t do much more than eat, sleep, cry and poop or pee at first, and that they can’t be much of a playmate right away. If you have any video footage of your older child as a newborn, use it to illustrate this point. Together, try out some fun activities to play with baby from day one, such as:

  • Singing or dancing for the new sibling
  • Offering a finger for the baby to squeeze
  • Chatting the baby up using different voices
  • Holding a soft toy for the baby to look at

Tell your firstborn that there’s nothing newborns like more than a human face, especially when it belongs to the best big sibling in the world.

The Art of Being Gentle

Your child may not realize how important it is to be gentle with newborn babies. Explain that babies need a very gentle touch because they’re still so little and not as strong as big kids like her. Have your child practice being gentle with a doll, holding it on her lap and stroking it softly like she’ll soon be doing with the new baby brother. Ask your little one to stroke your arm gently too and say things like, “Gentle feels good! The baby will love when you’re gentle.” Point out areas that your firstborn will have to be especially careful with, like the baby’s eyes, the soft spot on his head, and his nose, ears and mouth.

Handle Gifts with Care

Welcoming a new baby to the house means plenty of presents, and that can be tough for a tot who’s hoping those pretty packages are for her. Before they start to pile up, explain to your child that friends and family want to help celebrate this happy time by giving gifts. Then go to your little one’s room and point out a few presents she got as a baby. You can also practice gracious sibling etiquette by rehearsing what might happen when people come bearing gifts. For example, the baby can’t open them, so he’ll need his big sibling to be a special helper and open his gifts for him. To help your tot get in on the celebrating, plan a gift she can give her new baby sibling, like a painting or drawing to hang near his crib. And don’t forget to give her an “I’m a big sibling” gift when the baby is born.

Image: WhatToExpect.com

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Out on the Town With a Baby or Two

Adding a baby (or two) to the family mix means having a strategy for dining out. These tips will help make things fun for everyone.

DO:

    Call ahead.

    This one step can make the difference between a fun night out and a “never again” experience. Make a reservation if possible, ask when the restaurant is least busy (breakfast and lunch are likely options), and make sure you can get a high chair. Are you getting a chilly response from the host? Don’t fight it — instead, find another spot where you’ll feel welcome.

    Be prepared.

    Don’t leave home without a fully stocked diaper bag! Bring a sufficient supply of Huggies Diapers and Huggies Wipes. Bring a bib or two or three, books and other quiet distractions, a sippy cup and snacks (just in case).

    Ask for an out-of-the-way table.

    A table that’s in a quiet corner gives you some privacy if you have to nurse and gives other guests a wide berth. That said, if you’re at a restaurant that features a show or kid-friendly entertainment, be sure to get a front row seat.

    Ask for baby’s food to be served immediately.

    Get your little one set up first to avoid fussiness. And don’t be shy about asking for baby-friendly foods that aren't on the menu, such as plain steamed veggies or a fruit plate.

    Clean up after your little one.

    If the area around where baby was stationed resembles a warzone, ask your waitperson for some napkins or a dustpan so that you can do some cleaning up. The waiter may demur, but your simple offer will make you a welcome return customer.

DON’T:

    Linger.

    Long, leisurely meals? Save those for date night when baby’s at home with a sitter. Don’t rush, but keep things moving. The less time you spend ordering, sipping your drink, and checking the bill, the better your chances of enjoying a meltdown-free experience.

    Forget your fellow diners.

    If your baby starts to fuss, take him out of the dining room until he calms down. Have your partner stroll with baby for a bit while you finish eating and then switch off. Or get your food to go and finish up at home (where you can still enjoy your meal and a clean kitchen!).

WhatToExpect.com

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Brain Power Playrooms

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First Valentine’s Day With Baby – A Special Time for Hugs and Kisses

Valentine’s Day has always been special for you and your partner. You may get a bunch of beautiful flowers or a box of chocolate truffles, or go out to an intimate dinner with champagne and candlelight.

But now your two has become three (or more) as baby enters the scene and the holiday takes on a whole different meaning. After all, is there anything that makes you love your partner even more than catching him making goo-goo eyes at your baby and singing a little tune while diaper-changing? Or finding baby snuggled on his chest while they both catch some well-deserved ZZZZs?

You know your expectations about the holiday have shifted if the idea of finding a sitter and trying to zip yourself into a non-maternity dress for a night out is anything but dreamy. Parenthood has changed your whole idea of romantic: finishing an entire meal together without being interrupted by baby’s cries now qualifies. So perhaps it’s time to find some new traditions. After all, Valentine’s Day with a new baby is truly a celebration of love and the best moments are just being together.

Here are some ideas of ways to celebrate Valentine’s Day now that you are a new parent:

  • Write an annual Valentine’s Day letter not only to your partner, but to your baby, outlining all the ways you love him/her. What makes you smile? What makes your heart sing? Make a special heart box to store them in to read together each year on February 14th.
  • Put that heart-shaped cookie cutter to work on pancakes, cookies, sandwiches, pizza and more. As soon as baby is old enough, let him or her get in on the action making a delicious mess with frosting, heart-shaped sprinkles and more. Then let the feast begin.
  • Once baby is walking, leave a trail of pink and red cut-out hearts that lead to a Valentine’s Day treat (perhaps a new huggable stuffed animal or heart-shaped pillow) or even to the breakfast table adorned with balloons, heart-shaped pancakes and pink strawberry-flavored milk.
  • Make a keepsake hug. Dip baby’s chubby little hands in washable paint and stamp on card stock with a little love message. Do this every year for a holiday timeline of baby’s growth.
  • Of course you hug and kiss baby every day, but make it special on Valentine’s Day. Have a morning snuggle hug fest in bed where you shower the family with love. Dress in heart-inspired outfits, eat some sweets and take silly selfies while you engage in a family hug. After all, the first hug they ever feel is from you.

Even though your baby is the new love in your life, don’t overlook your partner. Try to carve out some time today when it’s just the two of you…even if most of your talk is about the amazing new member of the family.

I always encouraged my husband to forgo the store-bought cards and write me some sentimental sweet nothings of his own to let me know what I really mean to him. I believe that something from the heart is always best. So grab a pen and remind your partner why you are together. And be sure to mention how appreciative you are for the wonderful things he or she does for you and baby. Now that’s love!

Image: Getty

 

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Baby looking up at mom

How Your Baby Sees the World

By WhatToExpect.com

 

As your baby leaves the dark, quiet comfort of your womb and enters the bright, noisy world around her, just what can she see? The short answer: Not much — but that will change, and fast. In the first six months of life, baby’s eyesight develops rapidly, since vision is closely linked to brain development. So as your baby’s brain matures in leaps and bounds, so does her eyesight. While it does, enjoy seeing baby take it all in as she reaches a few key milestones in visual development.

Birth to a few weeks old


In utero, baby’s eyes begin growing at around week 4 of pregnancy and can perceive light at around week 16. But a fetus’s eyelids remain closed until 26 weeks gestation — and even then, the view from the womb is pretty limited. That means when your baby enters her newly expanded world, it’s a kaleidoscope of fuzzy images to her unaccustomed eyes. At first, the farthest your baby will be able to see is the distance from your arms to your face (about 6 to 10 inches).

Some newborns do look directly at your face after birth (“Hi, Mom”), while others keep those peepers tightly squeezed shut (“Excuse me, I was sleeping!”). Both reactions are perfectly normal: While some infants naturally focus on faces and objects, others need a little more time to adjust to the newly expanded world around them. Your own baby’s pace will depend on everything from her gestational age to her individual personality.

Either way, for the first month baby’s eyes will, for the most part, be closed as she sleeps for long stretches of time. When her eyes do open, she’s can’t yet track moving objects. Still, babies of this age generally do love looking at faces — so make sure to give your little one lots of up-close-and-personal time with you and other caretakers.

2 to 3 months old


At this age, some babies may start to recognize faces (and treat you to a first smile) — but their sight is still fairly blurry. Babies who are born prematurely may take a bit longer to focus on your face, but don’t fret: They will catch up developmentally. In all likelihood your baby will be checking you out in detail in no time.

While experts aren’t certain of how much color newborns can see, this is when they’re likely able to begin noticing different hues.

3 to 4 months old


Has baby begun watching closely from her bouncy seat as you cook dinner on the far side of the room? That’s because around this age, babies can see anywhere from several feet in front of them to all the way across the room.

By 4 months old, your baby can also track faster movements with her eyes, perceive depth and even grab at moving objects — although her hand-eye coordination may not yet allow her to actually hold onto the target of her attention.

Perhaps the most exciting part of baby’s sight at this stage is that the fovea (the part of the eye that controls the ability to see details) has developed — which means your little one can finally recognize your face with much more clarity.

5 to 7 months old


By now, your baby’s vision has nearly fully developed. Babies can notice differences in shades of color and may even begin favoring specific ones. (Hint for toy-buying: many babies show a preference for red and blue).

12 months old


As you light the candles on her first birthday cake, your baby is finally able to see as much as the singing adults around her.

Stimulating Your Baby’s Sight


The best ways to improve your baby’s eyesight are simple — you may already do many of these naturally:

• Chat baby up. When you’re breast- or bottle-feeding, your face is close enough for even the youngest baby to see — and it’s also conveniently one of her favorite things to observe. So talk to her while you look her in the eyes — you’ll bond and help her begin to learn language, too.
• Hang a mobile. Babies love images with contrasting colors and patterns. So until your little one is able to sit up (at about month 3 or 4), securely hang a colorful, patterned mobile high above her crib or bouncy seat. (Just make sure to remove it as soon as she can sit to prevent her from becoming entangled).
• Mirror her. Another visual hit with babies: mirrors. While they can’t recognize themselves until about month 15, they do love seeing the changing image reflected back at them as they move.
• Bring baby along for the ride. Bring baby in a forward-facing carrier as you go about your day — whether you’re taking a walk around your neighborhood, shopping for groceries or just brushing your teeth. Describe what you see to boost her verbal development at the same time she’s observing the world around her.

Signs of Vision Problems


While many infant vision problems are only detectable by a pediatrician or an ophthalmologist, you can take a few steps to ensure early intervention on any potential issues:

• Snap photos. While “red eye” isn’t the look you’re going for, this nuisance actually shows that baby’s eyes are correctly refracting light. Pictures that show whiteness in baby’s pupils, on the other hand, indicate a condition known as leukocoria, which may signal serious problems (such as a cataract or a tumor) that require attention from a pediatrician right away.
• Watch for focus. In the first few months, it’s normal for a baby’s eyes to sometimes seem like they’re looking in different directions (a condition known as strabismus). However if this continues past 4 months, take your child to a pediatrician for an evaluation. Same goes if your baby doesn’t seem to focus on your face and instead appears to be looking through or around you, or if she consistently seems to be looking off to one side.
• Check if she’s interested in objects. If by around 4 months old your baby can’t track objects or by 7 months old doesn’t seem interested in any new visuals you show her (like that bright new toy you just bought), check in with your doctor.
Monitor for other eye issues. Other symptoms that merit a trip to the doctor include bulging eyes, eyes that seem to quickly flutter up and down or side to side, constant redness or wateriness, sensitivity to light, itchy eyes or eye pain.
If you notice any of the above or any other visual issues that don’t seem quite right, don’t hesitate to bring baby to the doctor for an exam.

Your Child’s First Eye Exam


If you’re regularly seeing your baby’s doctor, you should catch any issues early — pediatricians regularly screen babies for vision problems at checkups. If your doctor does notice any potential issues, he may refer you to a pediatric ophthalmologist.
Some children, including preemies, babies with Down syndrome or those with a family history of eye issues, should see an ophthalmologist in the first few months of life. Otherwise, if your child has no risk factors, her first vision screening should be at age 3 and a half or 4 years old, since that’s when kids can verbalize what they see (and a whole lot more) — including what’s on an eye chart.

Updated 9/2/15

WhatToExpect.com

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Watch this helpful video to learn more about all of the great improvements made to the Huggies® Rewards program.

Say Goodbye to Rewards Codes

You asked, we listened! Introducing two new ways to get your Huggies® Rewards Points when you buy: submitting a receipt and loyalty card linking — exclusively for Huggies® Rewards. 

Huggies Rewards Submit Receipts instead of Rewards Codes

Submit Your Receipts

There's a faster way to get your Huggies® Rewards Points! Earn points by uploading and submitting a photo of your receipt for all Huggies® Diapers and Wipes. You'll even get 2x the points for your first receipt submission! 

SUBMIT MY FIRST RECEIPT
Huggies Rewards Submit a receipt for points

Get More Points!

Now there are more ways to earn points! From reading articles, to taking surveys, to sharing on Facebook & Twitter. More ways to earn = more ways to love Huggies®!

MY EXTRA POINTS PAGE
Huggies Rewards Contact Us

New Huggies® Rewards App

Get the most out of your Huggies® Rewards experience. The new Rewards app has all the same great features as the website, right at your fingertips. Available in the App Store® and get it on Google Play™.

 

Apple, the Apple logo, and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

Android, Google Play, and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.
 

 

 

LEARN MORE
Huggies Rewards App

Welcome, !

We're Sorry. The Huggies Rewards service is under maintenance and is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Join Huggies Rewards

By clicking SIGN UP you are agreeing to the Huggies® Rewards Terms & Conditions.

Join today and receive 500 free points! You'll also start earning Reward Points for all of your purchases. Points earned can be used towards gift cards, free diapers and wipes, and so much more!

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