Help narrow my results
Filter
Close Filter
Content type
Baby's age

First Weeks Home

When it’s time to bring your baby home, Huggies is here to lend a hand during those first few weeks. We’ve put together everything you need to make you and your baby feel right at home.

We’re sorry, no results were found.

  • Use fewer filters
  • Reset your criteria and try different filters

Or try browsing all categories.

What To Know About Pumping Milk: The Real Deal

Whether you’re planning to go back to work or you’d like your husband to pitch in with feeding, a breast pump is probably high on your list of must-have baby gear. But before you get one, read on.

Wait until after the baby comes

"When there are no immediate postpartum breastfeeding problems for either you or the baby, there’s usually no reason to pump at all after you first give birth," says Sheela Geraghty, M.D., a pediatrician and lactation consultant who is Medical Director of the Center for Breastfeeding Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. If you end up needing to pump in the first few weeks, it’s better to rent a more efficient hospital-grade pump than to use a commercial version. After those first few weeks, your breasts will have established a good milk supply, so you can switch to a store-bought pump if you like. Another tip: Register for a gift card at the baby store instead of a pump. "That way, if you decide you don’t want or need a pump after all, you can spend the money on diapers or other things," says Dr. Geraghty.

Talk to other moms

Electric or manual? Single or double? Dr. Geraghty, herself a mother of triplets, notes that most working moms prefer the double electric breast pump because you can express the most milk in the least amount of time. "I had both an electric and a manual pump, and although I preferred the electric, I found that the manual one was really handy for travel," says Libby Fearnley, a mother of one from Pottstown, Pennsylvania. Some moms find manual ones less user-friendly. "I didn’t like the fact that I needed two hands," notes Jill Alie, a mother of three in Cumming, Georgia. "When I laid my daughter down to pump, she’d wail."

Remember, one size doesn’t fit all

"I wasn’t making enough milk for my little girl after I returned to work," says Liz Litts, a mother of two in Stillwater, New York. "Then I read that sometimes, the wrong cone size can be the problem. I switched to a bigger size and it helped!"If the breast shield that comes with the pump (a medium) feels snug or loose, you’ll need to buy a different size separately online or at a baby store.

Get used to breastfeeding before you pump

"Many new mothers think they need to have a freezer full of milk before they go back to work and so they start pumping immediately after birth," says Dr. Geraghty. "But pumping too soon can thwart your efforts at establishing a good breastfeeding routine—a baby latching on and often is the best way to establish a good milk supply." Even if you’re going back to work in as little as 6 weeks after giving birth, it’s a good idea to wait at least a couple of weeks after birth before you start. Happy pumping!

Print

Transitioning into Training Pants

"Moving into training pants is a key sign for your child that she is becoming a Big Kid and therefore should start using the potty," says former Pull-Ups® Potty Training Partner, Page Turner.

Below are some helpful insights from Page and the Pull-Ups® Brand for transitioning tots to training pants and completing potty training:

  • Build excitement around the milestone of moving into trainings pants that are just like Big Kid underwear. To get my twins excited about becoming big girls, I had them store their training pants in the dresser drawer just like real underwear.
  • Have your child practice pulling them on and off themselves before starting to use them. In my case, practice really did make perfect!
  • Try giving your tot the chance to sit on the potty – first with the pants on and later with them off. I had my girls sit on the potty after they helped decorate it with stickers, which really helped create excitement about the whole process.
  • Teach your child about the graphics that disappear when wet and indicate the difference between wet and dry.
  • Celebrate when your toddler correctly uses the training pants to encourage Big Kid behavior. Or try celebrating with an outing they enjoy – my kids always love a special trip to the park.
  • Once you’ve made the switch out of diapers and into training pants, don’t switch back and forth. It may be confusing and slow down the process. Set backs are inevitable, but I found my kids made the most progress when I kept them in training pants, even when we went on vacation.

Print

Essential Tools for Potty Training

Julie, former Pull-Ups® Potty Training Partner and stay-at-home mom with a four-year-old daughter and a seven-year-old son offers real-life insights.

We talked with Julie about toilet training and the steps she took to ensure her toddler felt like a Big Kid.

Having a System Makes Potty Training Easier

Every parent knows that the potty training process is not something you can approach blindly or with the expectation that your child will be toilet trained in a week. Potty training involves having a system in place before you begin that includes finding the right tools, researching information on the topic, obtaining support from family and friends and being prepared as a parent to hang in there for the eight - ten months it will most likely take.

"When my kids expressed interest and showed readiness skills like sitting on the potty and wanting to wear Big Kid underwear, I went to friends who had recently toilet trained their children for advice," said Julie. "They helped me realize there were steps I needed to take to prepare myself and my kids to potty train, and their understanding and support really meant a lot."

Julie suggests that parents start by being realistic in terms of expectations and understand that successful potty training should be approached with consistency and patience. Every child is different and some children take longer than others. Research conducted by the Medical College of Wisconsin shows that it takes eight months on average to potty train a child.

Julie also suggests that parents identify those who will be a support system-spouse, family, and friends. They'll be there to help find some humor in those difficult days and to help maintain consistency in the process if they're helping out. For Julie, that meant leaning on her best friend.

When she toilet trained her first child, Julie researched information, reading magazines and books to find out everything she could about toilet training. She also suggests tapping into websites that give parents useful tips for every parenting stage, like www.Pull-Ups.com, which has useful sets of activities and resources, such as, Big Kid Beginnings or the Big Kid Prep List that help parents identify what potty training stage their child is at. Books, magazines and advice from other moms also help give you guidelines on potty training do’s and don’ts.”

Julie also found that involving her children in decision-making motivated them to stick to the potty training system.

"For both my son and daughter, we made going to the store to pick out a potty seat and their own disposable training pants big events," said Julie. "We really wanted to signal to them that they weren't babies anymore, so we moved them into Pull-Ups® training pants and started talking to them about what it meant to be a Big Kid."

Throughout the process it's important to coach children with praise and hugs, as well as other rewards. Julie and her husband rewarded their kids with stickers and small toys. However, every child is different, so choose rewards that relate to and motivate your child.

"As a parent, you'll learn that you can't push or get frustrated. Each child will train when he or she is ready," Julie concluded. "Hang in there…it's two steps forward and one step back, but once you find a system that works with your child, stick with it. They'll be using the potty by themselves in no time."

Make sure you have these essential tools when potty training your child.

  • Support from family and friends
  • General information from resources like books, magazines or your pediatrician
  • Potty seat
  • Pull-Ups® Big Kid* Flushable Wipes
  • Pull-Ups® disposable training pants
  • Reward system
  • Easy access to www.Pull-Ups.com and the Pull-Ups* Big Kid App

Print

Gearing up to go potty

  1. Acknowledging the potty

    The very first step toward potty-training is having your child understand when he's going to the bathroom. He'll start telling you when he's going or has gone. He'll want his diaper changed immediately because he recognizes that he's uncomfortable. Then you can start introducing the concept of the potty. For example, after he's gone in his diaper, discard it in the toilet and help him flush!

  2. Well, hello potty

    Before you bring your child in contact with the toilet, it may be useful to think about getting a child's potty seat. One idea is to draw a colorful, fun potty out of construction paper and post it next to the actual potty, so that she can associate the drawing with the real thing. Ask her if she would like to use the potty before bath time or after a nap. If she refuses, remain positive and say, "Okay, maybe next time!" If she is excited, follow through with the process.

  3. Big kids go potty

    Once your child sits on the toilet — or even if he just tries — praise him enthusiastically. If he actually goes, giving him a reward such as a piece of candy is one approach but also encourage him after he's done by clapping and saying things like "Good job!" and "Big boys go on the potty!"

  4. Signs of readiness

    Potty training could take about, on average, eight weeks — but this is highly individual. What's just as important as waiting for your child to show readiness is that you pick up on behavior demonstrating that your child might not be ready. Once she sits on the potty, if she doesn't get down to business and starts fiddling with the toilet paper, whining or even crying, for example, then it's time to wait a few more weeks before you start again.

  5. Ditching the diapers

    As the concept of using the toilet becomes more prominent, set your watch every hour and encourage your child to go frequently. Associate certain times of day with going to the bathroom — first thing in the morning, before and after nap/rest time, after lunch, before bed and so forth. And make sure that as a parent, you're frequently and noticeably using the bathroom as well.

  6. Potty pointers

    Don't succumb to pressure, and don't pass pressure on. Although your friends may be potty training their children or have a child who, they say, "self-trained at 18 months," don't feel as if your child is not as advanced because he lacks the physical readiness to use the potty. Remember, your child must be physically independent in addition to being emotionally ready. Some kids, too, need to decide that the benefits of being a "big kid" and wearing underwear outweigh the convenience of diapers.

The best advice overall is to stay positive and enthusiastic — both for you and for your child — and remember what parents who have been there say: "Don't worry — she's not going to go to college in diapers!"

Learn more at PullUps.com    

Print
Browse content
Close
close

Our Points Structure Has Changed

We are changing our Rewards Points structure so that we can improve our Huggies® Rewards program to offer you more ways to earn points. So, we are multiplying the cost of Rewards items by 10. But don't worry, your points balance is also multiplied by 10!

Our Points structure has changed

See How Rewards Has Changed

Watch this helpful video to learn more about all of the great improvements made to the Huggies® Rewards program.

Say Goodbye to Rewards Codes

You asked, we listened! Introducing a new way to get your Huggies® Rewards Points. Now you can earn points faster by uploading and submitting a photo of your receipt for all of your favourite Huggies® Diapers and Wipes purchases.

Huggies Rewards Submit Receipts instead of Rewards Codes

Submit Your Receipts

There's a faster way to get your Huggies® Rewards Points! Earn points by uploading and submitting a photo of your receipt for all Huggies® Diapers and Wipes. You'll even get 2x the points for your first receipt submission!

SUBMIT MY FIRST RECEIPT
Huggies Rewards Submit a receipt for points

Get More Points!

Now there are more ways to earn points! From reading articles, to taking surveys, to sharing on Facebook & Twitter. More ways to earn = more ways to love Huggies®!

MY EXTRA POINTS PAGE
Huggies Rewards Contact Us

New Huggies® Rewards App

Get the most out of your Huggies® Rewards experience. The new Rewards app has all the same great features as the website, right at your fingertips. Available in the App Store® and get it on Google Play™.

 

Apple, the Apple logo, and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

Android, Google Play, and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. 

Learn More
Huggies Rewards App
We're Sorry. The Huggies Rewards service is under maintenance and is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Join Huggies Rewards

By clicking SIGN UP you are agreeing to the Huggies® Rewards Terms & Conditions.

Join today and receive 500 free points! You'll also start earning Reward Points for all of your purchases. Points earned can be used towards gift cards, free diapers and wipes, and so much more!

By leaving this page, you will be signed out of your Huggies account. Please complete your profile to remain signed in.

Back to Top

©2016 KCWW.ALL RIGHT RESERVED

AdChoices