Help narrow my results
Filter
Close Filter
Content type
Baby's age

Diapering

Who knew that something as simple as changing your baby’s diapers could raise so many questions? Huggies has tips, advice and guides on how to make diaper time a happy one.

We’re sorry, no results were found.

  • Use fewer filters
  • Reset your criteria and try different filters

Or try browsing all categories.

Smooth as a baby's bottom...or not

Parents may be concerned by their "bundle-of-joy's" less than perfect skin, but a dermatologist can evaluate and determine which conditions will resolve themselves and which may need additional treatment.

Recurrent diaper rash is the most common skin condition for which new parents seek a dermatologist's advice. This condition is caused by persistent wet, soiled diapers and the use of unnecessary baby products, such as powders, creams, lotions and oils. "When a baby has diaper rash, parents should remember to change diapers frequently, use a warm, wet washcloth instead of pre-moistened baby wipes on the bottom, and apply a barrier cream with zinc oxide to the affected area," stated Dr. Cambio. "Also, keeping the area open to the air as long as possible before putting a clean diaper on can help prevent the condition."

Atopic dermatitis or eczema, also is a common condition found in newborns and young children. This itchy, oozing, crusting rash occurs mainly on the face and scalp, but patches can appear anywhere. "This condition also can be confused with cradle cap, a common, red, scaly rash most commonly seen on the scalp, sides of the nose, eyebrows, eyelids and the skin behind the ears," said Dr. Cambio. "Eczema treatment can include the use of an over-the-counter or prescription topical, steroid-free antihistamine, while cradle cap usually clears without treatment by 8 to 12 months."

Baby acne, which can have the appearance of pimples and whiteheads along the nose and cheeks, is quite common in newborns as the hormones from the mother increase oil production in an infant's skin and the immature oil glands get clogged. This condition usually clears within three weeks without treatment.

The appearance of a birthmark on a newborn's body can be stressful for parents, but there are many treatments available to fade and even remove these skin conditions, especially from the face. The two most common types of birthmarks are hemangiomas and port-wine stains. Both types can grow as a child grows, but port-wine stains are present at birth, while hemangiomas may not immediately appear. Oral corticosteroids can be prescribed or a pulsed dye laser can be used to significantly improve the appearance of these birthmarks.

Print

What Makes a Diaper Great?

Print

Mom-Approved Diaper Bag Checklist

Print

Change Is Good Diapering 101

Here you'll learn how to master the delicate art of diaper changing. When diapering is not a chore, you'll find that both you and your baby can enjoy the time you spend together in this daily routine. Over the years we've learned plenty about diapering babies — and have gathered some of the best suggestions right here. 

Gather changing essentials

Most parents agree that a well-planned changing area makes diapering quicker and easier. Keep essential supplies close at hand (yet out of baby's reach) on nearby shelves. Essential supplies include: diapers, baby wipes, baby lotion (cream or oil), cotton, petroleum jelly, diaper rash cream and diaper rash liquid powder.

Since a baby who is preoccupied is a baby who won't wiggle and squirm, give baby something to look at while being changed — such as an unbreakable mirror or a colorful picture. Later on, when baby is able to grasp objects, keep favorite toys close at hand. 

Easy as 1-2-3

Step 1

Gently lay your baby down on a flat, firm surface. Unfasten the soiled diaper and hold both your baby's legs up by grasping both ankles with one hand. Remove the soiled diaper and thoroughly cleanse baby's bottom in and around all the creases with HUGGIES® Baby Wipes, and be sure to wipe baby's bottom from front to back.

Step 2

Now apply any jelly, cream or powder you're going to use. If you use baby powder or cornstarch, shake it carefully into your hand first and then pat it on your baby. That way baby won't breathe in a cloud of powder. Or, use liquid powders that don't have airborne particles.

Step 3

Next, slide a clean diaper under your baby so that the fasteners are in the back. Pull the diaper up between baby's legs, making sure it's on straight, so it will wrap evenly around baby's hips. Then open the tabs, place them over the front of the diaper, and press them down firmly in place. For a snug fit, fasten the side closest to you first. Then roll your baby toward you to tighten and fasten the other side. Try to keep the overlap of front and back as neat as possible so the diaper will hug baby's waist comfortably.

If you want to tighten or adjust the diaper, simply lift the fasteners and reposition them anyplace on the special tab "landing zone," which is often marked by colorful characters near the top of the waistband. The fasteners on HUGGIES® diapers are refastenable and can be opened and fastened again as often as necessary.

Special safety note: Be aware that even a tiny newborn infant can roll off a changing table. So either use a changing table with a strap or keep one hand on your baby at all times.

The scoop on poop

Most new babies have between one and 10 bowel movements daily, and their stools are usually quite loose. It may be weeks, or even months, before your baby has well-formed, pasty stools. If you are breast-feeding, your newborn may have a bowel movement at every nursing, and the stools will probably be much looser than those of a bottle-fed baby. Some babies may not have a bowel movement for up to three days at times — this is not abnormal. But if your baby has trouble pushing the stool out or goes longer than three days without a bowel movement, call your doctor right away. 

You should also be aware that breast-fed babies usually have stools of a yellowish-greenish color and those of bottle-fed babies tend to look darker. 
If you notice an increase in the number of your baby's bowel movements, or if you notice a change in color or odor, your baby may have a case of diarrhea and you should consult your doctor at once. 

And, because newborns have loose and frequent stools, you'll want to make sure your new baby wears diapers with elastic at the legs and waist. They'll give a secure fit to help stop leaking.

The heartbreak of diaper rash

Even with the most expert and careful diaper changes, diaper rash happens. It's one irritation most babies go through, particularly if their skin is sensitive. Despite its name, diaper rash isn't really caused by diapers. It is caused by bacteria that react with urine in a baby's wet diaper to form ammonia. It's the ammonia that irritates the skin, causing small, red pimples or patches of rough, red skin.

Doctors say that keeping a baby dry is the best way to prevent diaper rash. So check diapers often and change them as soon as they show the slightest trace of wetness. Highly breathable diapers like HUGGIES® can also help keep baby's skin dry. Of course, if your baby has a mild case of diaper rash, be extra careful to change diapers frequently. Your doctor will probably also recommend that you apply a thin layer of protective ointment or petroleum jelly to the affected area. 

Also, many mothers report that leaving diapers off a baby for at least 15 minutes daily often helps to clear up a case of diaper rash. Of course, if a rash doesn't heal in a couple of days, consult your doctor.

Diapers to go

The diaper bag is the essential piece of luggage whenever you travel with your baby. You can buy a diaper bag made just for that purpose, or easily improvise one out of almost any roomy canvas or nylon tote.

What to pack? Be prepared for anything with the following diaper bag essentials: a HUGGIES® Baby Wipes Travel Pack, a supply of HUGGIES® Diapers, plastic bags with twist ties for easy disposal, whatever cream, jelly, or protective ointment you use, and — in a separate pocket of the bag — any bottles needed for meals on the go. Don't forget a small toy or rattle to distract your squirming baby while you diaper. And HUGGIES® Disposable Changing Pads are perfect for changes on the go. They protect your baby from unsanitary surfaces in public restrooms and safeguard floors, rugs and furniture in homes you visit.


Print

What’s Your Trick For Changing Diapers On The Go?

Stick to a three-diaper minimum.

“I always have at least three diapers in the bag—one for the change I anticipate, one for the change I don’t, and one as a ‘sacrifice’ diaper, when the change I didn’t anticipate turns into a blowout.”’ —Lori Rosen, Summit, New Jersey; mom of two. 

Prepare for change. 

“From watching the Food Network, I’ve learned that French chefs have a technique they call ‘mis èn place,’ which means ‘putting in place.’ They know that dicing and slicing before they cook helps everything go smoothly. I apply the same to diapering. I make sure I’m ready for action—with wipes, a plastic bag and a change of clothes—before the diaper’s off.” —Taylor Newman, Austin, Texas; mom of one.

Create a distraction.

“My smartphone is my secret to getting the job done quickly. I stream some children’s music, lay the phone on the changing table, and it mesmerizes my baby. It’s so much easier to change a calm baby than a wriggly one.” —Stephanie O’Hara, Long Island, New York; mom of one.

Keep it clean. 

“I have a mini bottle of hand sanitizer in my diaper bag that I refill from a big bottle at home. I use it after diaper changing to wipe my baby’s feet, hands, and whatever else got pooped on.” —Peggy Cheng, Oakland, California; mom of two. 

Pick up a portable changing pad. 

“I use something called the Skip Hop Pronto Changing Station. It's a clutch that folds out into a changing mat and has pockets for wipes, diapers and cream. It’s nice and flat, so I can put it on gross public changing tables, in the trunk of my car, or even on the ground.” —Nora McCarthy, Norwalk, Connecticut; mom of two. 

Go in style. 

“I bought a chic, oversize purse to fit diaper essentials and all my stuff. I have everything in easy reach for quick changes in restrooms and it helps me feel like a woman…not an overpacked mom!” —Pamela Yonkin, Portsmouth, New Hampshire; mom of two.


Print

Good Poop? Bad Poop? Or Is It All Just Poop?

The first baby poop

Technically called meconium, this is the dark greenish black sticky stuff that you'll first see in diapers. It's not true poop but basically an elimination of a substance found in your baby's intestines while he's womb-bound.

Real newborn poop

This is a yellow, mustard, brownish poop that occurs early on. Usually this is less smelly than what's to come later. You may see small seed-like bits in this poop; no worries, that's normal.

Food poop:

Yuck, right? Once your babe starts on solids, his poop is going to get icky and smell way worse. Your baby's poop may be green, orange, or another food-like color, which is normal.

Formula poop

Babies who are fed formula have different poop than breastfed babies (commonly that mustard-looking stuff mentioned above). If your baby eats formula, his poop may be darker brown and can smell of iron vitamins. This is typical and nothing to worry about.

Print

Secrets of a smart diaper bag

The essentials

  • 2-4 spare diapers (if using cloth, also add wraps or pins/covers)
  • Diaper wipes
  • Plastic bags for used diapers/dirty clothes
  • 1-2 changes of clothes for baby
  • Formula/bottles (if not nursing)
  • Any prescription medication

The extras

  • Extra formula (or powder and water)
  • Extra pacifier (keep clean in a baggie)
  • Burp cloth
  • Sweater or coat for baby
  • No-spill cup/bottle or a juice box
  • Pacifier and holder
  • Bib
  • Hat
  • Blanket (for warmth or nursing privacy)
  • Children's acetaminophen
  • Small package of facial tissues
  • Camera
  • Photos/brag book
  • Toys/books
  • Snacks (for baby and you)

Just for mom

  • Clean shirt (in case of poop explosions, spitup, etc.)
  • Breast pads
  • Bottle of water
  • Cell phone

Note: Of course, the contents of your diaper bag will vary depending on the age of your baby, whether or not you have other kids, and your parenting style. It will take you some time to figure out just what you need... and then your baby will grow up a little more, and everything will change again!

Print

Clean-up Time: Bottom-up Basics

Bathing baby

Bath time can be a special bonding time for the two of you, but many new moms are too tentative with their wriggly, wet little creature to actually relax and enjoy it. But if you follow these simple tips, you'll be able to relish the moments you have with your "water baby."

As long as their faces and their bottoms are kept clean, most babies don't need a full bath more than once or twice a week. Just use a warm, wet washcloth to keep skin creases clean as necessary. Also remember — until the belly button is completely healed, you should stick with sponge baths to keep that area dry.

When you are going to bathe your newborn, it's important to have everything you need on hand, right by the sink or tub. Once the baby is in the water, you won't be able to walk away to retrieve a forgotten washcloth or bar of soap.

Scrub a dub dub — get these essentials in the tub:

  • A baby wash or soap, like Maclaren Beginning Baby Soothing Delicate Soap or Aveeno Calming Soap. Adult soaps are too drying for newborn skin.
  • A clean washcloth and sponge
  • Cotton balls
  • A baby shampoo, like Johnson's or Mustela
  • A towel — hooded towels make it easier to wrap baby (we love the Lion Hooded Towel by Mullins Square)
  • Q-Tips or other cotton swabs

For easiest cleaning, a tiny baby can be washed in the bathroom sink. As she gets bigger, a baby tub like the First Years Sure Comfort Tub by Learning Curve can be placed in your own tub to make bathing more manageable.

Make sure the bath water is warm, not hot, as babies are easily scalded. Some tubs, such as 4 Moms The Clean Water Infant Tub, come with built-in thermometers, or you can buy a floating bath tub thermometer such as Safety First's Floating Bath Pal. Bath water should be approximately 90 degrees, or warm and comfortable to your touch.

Use cotton balls to gently clean the baby's eyes before the bath. Put your baby into the water slowly, and use a cup to pour water over him so he doesn't get cold. Use soap sparingly, and gently clean the baby front to back, top to bottom. Rinse using the sponge or by wringing clean water from the washcloth over soapy areas.

Wash baby's head once or twice a week using baby soap or shampoo. Rub gently, then rinse using a clean washcloth. Then wrap baby in a towel and pat her dry.

Diapering baby

Of course, the genital area should be cleaned with each diapering. To properly diaper the baby — and keep this area clean — follow these simple steps:

  1. Gather your supplies. You will need your choice of diapers, a changing pad or cloth diaper (to keep surface clean), fasteners (if not using disposables), and diaper wipes or a clean wet washcloth. Some moms may also choose to use an ointment, such as A&D Ointment, or a petroleum jelly like Vaseline to treat or prevent diaper rashes.
  2. Place baby on diaper pad, and remove the dirty diaper. (Hint: the dirtier the diaper is, the further out of reach you should place it. Babies have been known to kick indiscriminately.)
  3. Using the diaper wipe or washcloth, clean your child's genitals from front to back. Lift the baby's legs by the ankles to reach all areas, and don't forget to clean those adorable chubby creases where — er — dirt can hide.
  4. After wiping, dry the baby. Then lift the baby by the legs again, and slip diaper beneath. (An alternative: place the diaper on the pad before putting baby down on it. This works best when changing doesn't involve a poopy diaper.)
  5. If desired, put ointment or Vaseline on the baby's bottom.
  6. Close diaper and fasten, using attached tape (if using disposables) or pins (if cloth).

Special side-note for mothers of boys — you may want to place a diaper or clean, dry washcloth over your son's penis before you begin the diapering process, or you may learn how appropriate the nickname of "little squirt" can be.

Print

Where’s The Weirdest Place You’ve Ever Changed A Diaper?

“On the back of a fire truck, right after a hometown parade.”—Tabitha P.

“In the garden center of Wal-Mart, on the display garden furniture.”—Kerry L.

“On a bench at a baseball park.”—Nicole H.

“On the church pew, in the middle of a service. I had three people to my right and three to my left and I didn’t want to climb over them. Since my grandpa is the pastor, it’s not a big deal!”—Martha V.

“In the grass on the side of a road in a subdivision. We were garage sale-ing, and there was nowhere else to go—the car was too hot.”—Tressa M.

“In a shopping cart at Target, in the frozen food aisle.”—Caitie S.

“In the waiting area of the automotive repair shop. Someone was in the bathroom. The looks I got from others were like, OMG, I can’t believe she is doing that. It was embarrassing, but funny now that I think about it.”—Meg L.

“On a bench in the middle of a waterfall.”— Alameda M.

“At the bank, on the bank manager’s desk. We were opening a safety deposit box and little Marilyn just had to go while we were there. They were so sweet about it”—Carrie A.

Visit Huggies’ Facebook page, where there’s always an interesting discussion going on!

Print
Browse content
Close
close

Our Points Structure Has Changed

We are changing our Rewards Points structure so that we can improve our Huggies® Rewards program to offer you more ways to earn points. So, we are multiplying the cost of Rewards items by 10. But don't worry, your points balance is also multiplied by 10!

Our Points structure has changed

See How Rewards Has Changed

Watch this helpful video to learn more about all of the great improvements made to the Huggies® Rewards program.

Say Goodbye to Rewards Codes

You asked, we listened! Introducing a new way to get your Huggies® Rewards Points. Now you can earn points faster by uploading and submitting a photo of your receipt for all of your favourite Huggies® Diapers and Wipes purchases.

Huggies Rewards Submit Receipts instead of Rewards Codes

Submit Your Receipts

There's a faster way to get your Huggies® Rewards Points! Earn points by uploading and submitting a photo of your receipt for all Huggies® Diapers and Wipes. You'll even get 2x the points for your first receipt submission!

SUBMIT MY FIRST RECEIPT
Huggies Rewards Submit a receipt for points

Get More Points!

Now there are more ways to earn points! From reading articles, to taking surveys, to sharing on Facebook & Twitter. More ways to earn = more ways to love Huggies®!

MY EXTRA POINTS PAGE
Huggies Rewards Contact Us

New Huggies® Rewards App

Get the most out of your Huggies® Rewards experience. The new Rewards app has all the same great features as the website, right at your fingertips. Available in the App Store® and get it on Google Play™.

 

Apple, the Apple logo, and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

Android, Google Play, and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. 

Learn More
Huggies Rewards App
We're Sorry. The Huggies Rewards service is under maintenance and is temporarily unavailable. Please try again later.

Join Huggies Rewards

By clicking SIGN UP you are agreeing to the Huggies® Rewards Terms & Conditions.

Join today and receive 500 free points! You'll also start earning Reward Points for all of your purchases. Points earned can be used towards gift cards, free diapers and wipes, and so much more!

Back to Top

©2016 KCWW.ALL RIGHT RESERVED

AdChoices