Help narrow my results
Filter
Close Filter
Content type
Baby's age

Feeding & Nutrition

Not all babies are the same, so it should come as no surprise that whatever your little one finds yummy may differ from other newborns. Huggies answers your questions and provides some food for thought when it comes to feeding your baby.

img

We’re sorry, no results were found.

To get more results you can use fewer filters

Another Milestone Reached: First Tooth

By: Melanie Blodgett

A couple weeks ago Beck was fisting it (a popular pastime) and chomped down a bit then let out a ferocious scream. I couldn’t imagine why gums would produce such a squawk so I opened his mouth to discover something I wasn’t quite prepared for. Yep, Beck got his first tooth at an early 3 1/2 months.

I immediately texted my sister since I knew that her kids were early getting their teeth and she confirmed that they had gotten them around the same time. I still kind of thought I might be seeing things so I waited until my husband got home for a second opinion. I don’t know what else I thought it might be. Oye.

So now that we’ve found ourselves in the midst of teething, I’ve quickly learned what’s helpful to have on hand for little teethers:

1. A bib or rag – There’s so much drooling and it’s common for there to be a runny nose as well.

2. A pacifier or chew toy (preferably one that is small enough for little mouths) – They will gnaw at that thing like a beaver.

3. Hyland’s Homeopathic Teething Gel – My friend gave this to me before I boarded a plane with my crying baby and it worked wonders.

4. A snuggly blanket and a mother’s soft cradle. Sorry, sometimes that’s all you can do.

Print

Bye-Bye, Bottle

Many pediatricians recommend weaning babies from bottle to cup sometime between 12 and 18 months. Extended sucking on bottles (or pacifiers or thumbs) could gradually change the shape of a toddler’s mouth, leading to problems with his dental arch or with speech. And while sippy cups have valves, bottles don’t — that means formula, milk or juice can continually dribble out, pooling around teeth and causing decay.

Making the move

To move from bottle to cup, first invite your baby to play with the cup and try it out when she’s not really hungry or thirsty, so she’s not frantic if she doesn’t figure it out right away. After she gets the hang of it, gradually substitute one bottle feeding at a time over the course of a week or more. End with the most beloved bottle, which is usually the one before bedtime or nap.

Bump up snuggle time

Make sure to give your baby lots of close physical contact and hugging when those final bottles are being replaced, so it’s only the bottle she’s missing, not your time or cuddling. And as with bottles, don’t let your child take a sippy cup of formula or breast milk to bed.

Shop around for sippy cups

If your child is really resistant to picking up a cup, try a cup with a different design or character. You can even let her pick a special cup herself. It may turn out that a different type of valve, spout or handles will work better for her.

Sandy and Marcie Jones are the authors of Great Expectations: Baby's First Year. Order your copy from Barnes & Noble

Print

How to Get Your Child to Use Forks and Spoons

A guide to making sure your child uses utensils as eating tools, not toys.

When should you introduce utensils? Babies don’t actually start using spoons correctly until they’re in that mimic-everything stage at nine months or so. In the meantime, you can give your child a spoon to hold for practice as you feed her.

Spoon or fork first? A baby spoon is your best bet. Truth is, when your little one starts whipping her arms around in excitement over her smooshed pears, even a baby spork can be dangerous.

Plastic? Soft rubber? Wood? "All are good in their own ways," says Wendy Sue Swanson, M.D., a pediatrician at Seattle Children’s Hospital and spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics. "The important thing is that the spoon is in good shape: no pieces missing from the rubber or any splintering in the wood. Give your baby different kinds to experiment with and she’ll find her own preference."

What about metal? That engraved silver spoon from Grandma may be beautiful, but it could be too hard on your baby’s tender gums. "Metal spoons also get colder or hotter, depending on the temperature of the baby food," Dr. Swanson says, "so they can get too warm or too cold for your baby’s liking." Save it for display.

And, come to think of it, what about plates? They’re not necessary when kids are learning to self-feed. "When my son was about 7 months old, I’d seat him in the high chair and put a glop of food directly on the tray, along with a plastic spoon for him to smear the food around," says Tracy Wilkes, a mom of two in Houston, Texas. "It took his attention away from the bowl of baby food I was spooning from, which he would usually try to grab in frustration. This way, he got to investigate food in his own way."

What if your tot takes the spoon from you? Let him have it. "I always have a spoon for me and a spoon for my 9-month-old," says Mandy Tipton, a mom of one in Seattle, Washington. "If he has a spoon in his hand, he’s not always reaching for the one in mine. If he does, then it’s a simple swap—I take the one he had!" She also always keeps a third spoon on hand in case one falls to the floor. "It’s inevitable," she says.

What if the mess is driving you nuts? "Accept the fact that feeding time is never going to be a pristine operation," Dr. Swanson says. "It’s going to be messy. And it should be—the more you let your baby participate in meals, the more she’s going to learn."

Print

Feeding your new finger foodie

Big step toward independence

About the time that babies start to move around on their own and pick up most anything and everything within reach, they begin to show an interest in feeding themselves. Self-feeding is a big step toward independence and also helps a baby learn eye, hand and mouth coordination.



Prepare yourself for messy mealtime

When it comes time for self-feeding, you'll want to encourage your baby's efforts and get ready for a few months of messy mealtimes — with more food on the face or on the floor than in the baby. This is okay, and a stage that every parent goes through. Take a deep breath and let them dig in!



First they gum

Finger foods should be firm enough to pick up and hold, yet tender enough to "gum" (and later on, to chew) and swallow easily. You can tell if a cooked food is the proper consistency for self-feeding if it can be pierced easily with a fork. Keep the pieces large enough for baby to grasp, but small enough so that even those pieces swallowed whole won't be lodged in the throat.



And then they chew

As your baby grows and becomes more adept at chewing, you can add munchier foods. Try zwieback or French toast, small chunks of soft cheese, or fruits that have been peeled and cut into bite-size pieces. Dry cereal is another favorite finger food, but one that's too difficult for babies of this age to manage. Wait until your child is about nine months old before offering this snack, and when you do, make sure it's the sugarless kind.



Signs that mealtime is over

Some babies may delight in flinging their food about or dropping it to watch it land on the floor. Babies will often do this toward the end of a meal when they've had enough to eat and are no longer hungry. If this happens, simply say that mealtime is over, take the baby down from the chair, and go on to some other — less messy — activity. Or, you may simply prefer to remove the food from the high-chair tray and give your baby a favorite toy or two to play with.



Keep it interesting, keep it healthy

You'll find other suggestions for finger foods in baby-food cookbooks. Of course, if you have any questions about suitable foods, ask your doctor. He or she is the best source of information about the proper nutrition for your baby.

Print
Browse content
Close

Welcome, !

Join Huggies Rewards

By clicking SIGN UP you are agreeing to the Huggies® Rewards Terms & Conditions.

Join today and receive 50 free points! You'll also start earning Reward Points for all of your purchases. Points earned can be used towards gift cards, free diapers and wipes, and so much more!

Welcome, !

Rewards History
Get 50 points for just signing up!
Join Today

What are Rewards Codes?

15-character codes on participating Huggies® Products that you can use to earn Huggies® Rewards points!

Where can I find them?

BAG OF DIAPERS

BOX OF DIAPERS/WIPES

REFILL BAG OF WIPES

Close ×

What are Rewards Offer Codes?

Offer Codes are limited-time offers to earn bonus points. They're 8 digits long and must be submitted at the same time as a participating product Rewards Code.

Close ×
Redeem Now Earn points