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Getting your little one to sleep like a baby can be a lot easier said than done. Huggies has compiled articles, advice and answers on how to get both you and your newborn snoozing soundly.

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Taming teething pain

The first tooth is a huge, super-exciting milestone — for mom and dad. But for baby, it’s not exactly fun. Even tiny teeth cutting through her gums can hurt, so it’s no wonder she may be cranky (and maybe scream a little).

Keep her entertained

Get your little one's mind off the pain. Take her somewhere new — like the zoo or a music class. Read her a great colorful baby board book, or just head out for some exploring at the park.

Make sure she's getting enough rest

A baby who is in pain will only be more upset if she's not sleeping well. If she can't sleep well due to pain, it might be time to try some medical treatments.

Medicinal treatments

Before attempting to give your baby medicine (natural or conventional), talk to your baby's pediatrician about your options, which will usually include things like:

  • Homeopathic teething tablets: Note that most contain small amounts of sugar, so wiping your baby's gums is important.
  • Baby Advil, MOTRIN or TYLENOL: This may be the best way to help your baby get some rest if teething pain is keeping her up. Save this sort of medicine for when the pain is halting your baby's regular activity because you never want to give too much over-the-counter medicine to your baby. (Always check with your healthcare provider before giving any medicines.)
  • Teething gel: I tried something like Baby Orajel with my son when he was teething, and it didn't seem to help, but your baby could be a different story. Keep in mind that teething gels cause lots of extra drooling, so be prepared with a cloth or your baby's chin may become irritated from excessive wetness.

Never rub your baby's gums with alcohol. This is an old-time remedy, it's true, but back when this was common, we had no idea how bad alcohol was. Alcohol in any form is never safe for your baby.

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Baby reading Pooh book

Books: Good to Read, Good to Chew On

Some research says that six-month-olds are not ready for books, which I personally disagree with.

I haven't had the luxury of doing an enormous study but I did read to Cedar practically from birth and by a year and a half he'd sit and look at books on his own. Now have a six-year-old who really loves story time. So I'm going with the earlier you start the better.

However, there's a difference between reading to your baby and making reading time fit your baby.

For instance, while your little one is still into eating rather than reading make sure you offer her books she can safely nibble. There are plenty of baby-proof, rip-free, fabric and soft plastic books out there. She can see words but not seriously harm the book.

Look at the book; don't simply read. It's okay to flip through a book and just talk about it with your baby or toddler. Ask questions about the pictures or place your finger on a picture or word and say it.

Grab a good mix. I've never limited the books I've read to Cedar by reading level. If he picks out a book "meant" for three- or nine-year-olds I don't argue. He loves books for many age groups and is even starting to like books with few pictures like Where the Sidewalk Ends.

Don't say no to repeats. Your baby and soon-to-be toddler will fall in love with certain books and you should read them over and over if that's what she wants. The first word Cedar ever recognized and pointed out on his own was a hard word. It was "Harold" which is likely due to the fact that he's made me read Harold and the Purple Crayon about 1,345 times.

Keep books within easy reach but make book rules. I'm pretty chill and we don't have all that many rules at my house. But since Cedar was a baby, I have stressed that he doesn't hurt books EVER. You don't color in them, rip them, step on them, etc. I have always kept his library of books where he can reach them and he's never hurt one yet. If you make books important, your baby will realize from the start that they are.

Don't just read at bedtime. Read as often as possible and give books, not toys, as some of your baby's birthday and holiday gifts.

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Drooling. Crankiness. Could it be...Teeth?

  • Drooling. Egad. I like everything about babies but the drooling. My son seemed to experience extended drooling (months and months) and drool was everywhere. But it is a sign that your little one is starting the teething process?
  • Biting: Maybe you notice it while breastfeeding or she'll just nip at your hand while playing. It's not a mean move — your baby just likes the counterpressure on her sore gums.
  • Irritability: Some babies get super cranky and some may just act a little off.
  • Insomnia: Technically your baby won't get insomnia but you might because she may be up and down, up and down, all night long. Night wakefulness is common during teething.
  • Coughing: Not a lot, just a bit of a cough caused by excess saliva.
  • Chin rash: My son the massive drooler got this due to irritation from his skin always being wet. If you can keep up, it helps some to try and wipe off your baby's face throughout the day with a dry cloth.
  • Ouch: A look of pain on your baby's face is common because who likes a tooth shooting through his gum — it hurts. Usually it's the first teeth that hurt the worst and then either babies adjust or quit complaining because painful expressions are less common the further into teething you two get.
  • Ear pulling: My boy never did this unless he had an ear infection, but some babies do pull on their ears due to pain in their mouths.

These eight good signs that mean your baby might be teething. Many of these signals can indicate something else though. If you have lingering doubts that one of these is not caused by teething, call or see your baby's doctor.

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Working Mother "Best in Play": 20 Winning Toys from the 2014 American International Toy Fair

By Jennifer Kelly Geddes, Working Mother


Laugh & Learn Smart Stages Chair by Fisher-Price

Your tot will scramble to sit on this bright and sunny perch when he realizes it plays songs and phrases each time he gets up. Smaller babies are equally entertained by lifting the seat to peek inside or hide blocks and books. We also love the light-up remote and flipbook that never get lost-they're smartly attached to the chair's arms.  And this genius toy's content can be updated with new songs and more complicated phrases to challenge your toddler's developing mind. Ages 6-36 months, $40.

Laugh & Learn Smart Stages Chair by Fisher-Price

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Laugh & Learn Smart Stages Chair by Fisher-Price

Your tot will scramble to sit on this bright and sunny perch when he realizes it plays songs and phrases each time he gets up. Smaller babies are equally entertained by lifting the seat to peek inside or hide blocks and books. We also love the light-up remote and flipbook that never get lost-they're smartly attached to the chair's arms.  And this genius toy's content can be updated with new songs and more complicated phrases to challenge your toddler's developing mind. Ages 6-36 months, $40.

Smart Shots Sports Center by VTech

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Smart Shots Sports Center by VTech

Traditional wooden playthings are always in style, but we can't forget those brilliant tech toys! This 2-in-1 soccer and hoop combo counts baskets after every swish and chirps a happy noise when a goal is scored. It also features twisty gears, a book to "read" and three buttons to press to hear silly tunes and learn shapes and opposites. But it's the super cute LED screen on top displaying animated shorts and calling out letters and numbers that makes this toy a slam dunk. Ages 1-3, $40.

Matching Game Who Lives Where by Haba

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Matching Game Who Lives Where by Haba

It was hard to decide which feature we like the best here-the sweet expressions on each animal's face, the fact that this toy suits a tot's stack-and-nest stage to a tee, or that little ones can sort and count, plus learn to gauge size, practice their colors and

pretend to run a zoo! Younger kids can try to fit the animals in each box, while older ones will notice the built-in clues (the side panels match each creature's color) to quickly find the right homes. Ages 18 months+, $40.

My First Shop by Duplo

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

My First Shop by Duplo

Duplo blocks are the gateway toy to Lego, perfectly sized to fit chubby hands and designed for easy manipulation. Of course your toddler can practice his building skills, but he'll also learn what happens at the grocery store as he plays alongside Mom or Dad. Driving, parking, strolling the aisles, choosing bread or apples, paying with the "money" block and then loading up the car to go home are all chances to reinforce language, colors and counting. Ages 2+, $25.

Coccimemo by Janod

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Coccimemo by Janod

This adorable memory game uses the ladybug's spots to cover up the answers-just lift a black circle to make a match. Inserting different disks, including ones with farm animals, colored fish and vegetables, changes up the game and tests your toddler with more a challenging array of choices. We also love the compact size, perfect for popping into a carry on bag or beach tote for this summer's vacation. Ages 2+, $30.

Learning Play Microscope by Manhattan Toy Company

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Learning Play Microscope by Manhattan Toy Company

A young toy designer had this microscope idea in his portfolio and was able to turn it into a winner for future scientists. Three lenses (clear, colored and kaleidoscopic) can be placed on the scope and peered through to examine different specimens. Turn the side crank to adjust the "focus," and then let your tot discover new germs in the Petri dish-or simply gaze at the cool patterns on the geometric disk. Quiet exploring for a toddler? Priceless. Ages 2+, $30.

Tunnel 'N Dome Climber by Little Tikes

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Tunnel 'N Dome Climber by Little Tikes

Bright colors and a multitude of shapes decorate this attractive indoor/outdoor climbing structure. Babies can learn to pull up by holding on to the squares on the lower level, while older tots will scramble through the tunnel to reach the middle of the dome. It's a fort, a clubhouse, a jungle gym, a pirate ship-or anything else your child imagines it to be. Ages 3-6, $150.

Balancing Tree by Plan Toys

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Balancing Tree by Plan Toys

These simple rectangular pieces can be elegantly stacked, creating a lovely tree in graduated shades of yellow and green. But beyond this Zen object is a fun game to be played with the six birds. Take turns arranging the fowl on the branches-without tipping it over (whoever places the most, wins). And don't just build a vertical tree! Stack the pieces on end and top with others to make a fence or bird-on-a-wire design. Ages 3+, $15.

The DIY Dream House by Hape

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

The DIY Dream House by Hape

This chic three-level abode features mod patterns on the walls, color-coordinated furniture and smart details (a flat screen, lamps, tiny bath towel, matching throw rugs-even a Lucite elevator that operates via pulley). The DIY aspect comes into play at back of the house-there are three chalkboard inserts for drawing doors, windows, flower gardens and trees. Four of the rooms are set (bath, bed, living and kitchen), leaving the top two spaces completely open-ended. Your young homeowner might create a home gym, office-or an art studio. Ages 3+, $200.

Interchangeable Puppet Theater by Preschool Collection/Maxim Enterprise

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Interchangeable Puppet Theater by Preschool Collection/Maxim Enterprise

A knight in shining armor gallops through the forest in search of his beloved princess. But what's this-the maiden has fallen in love with a lion and wants to run away with him instead? Yup, with a quick flip of the scenery, the story line takes a turn. On one side you'll see leafy trees flanking the stage, while the other features clouds floating overhead and stone castle towers. Get your tickets now

to see the four sweet finger puppets act out your budding thespian's latest tale. Ages 3+, $60.

My First Crayola Super Stamping Kit

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

My First Crayola Super Stamping Kit

Most stamps are too small for little hands to use (and don't get us started on how badly ink pads can stain!). To the rescue: Crayola's super-smart stamping kit has large shapes for easy grasping (stars, circles, hearts and squares) and washable

ink in two different colors. This kit is packed with crayons, stickers, colored pencils, construction paper, safety scissors and stickers so your kid can decorate placemats, wrapping paper, birthday cards and more.  Ages 3+, $20.

Safari Set by Magformers

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Safari Set by Magformers

Want to build a 3-D yellow and green ostrich? What about a toucan with a triangular beak? A modern zoo or African safari is easy to create: all of the 83-piece Magformers magnets attract and connect and are safely tucked away inside brightly colored building shapes. P.S. If your geometry's a little rusty, bone up before you sit down to play-this set contains hexagons and trapezoids! Ages 3+, $150.

Snacks & Sweets Food Cart by Melissa & Doug

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Snacks & Sweets Food Cart by Melissa & Doug

Who doesn't

love an ice-cold soda or a Chipwich from a street vendor? This toy recalls that classic New York City icon, complete with hot dogs, pretzels, ketchup and mustard, and all the creamy treats kids love-Popsicles, cones, lemon ice and more. The bright awning advertises savory choices on one side and then flips to show sweets on the other. Plus, this cart really rolls, so kids can move it around the house or backyard as they sell their products. Ages 3+, $200.

SmartMax Factory with Car by Smart Toys and Games

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

SmartMax Factory with Car by Smart Toys and Games

We were instantly sold on the easy-grip magnetized parts that make this toy a breeze for little hands to assemble. The play is two-fold: Not only can the structure be newly made each time (there's not just one way to build the factory), but your worker bee will delight in dropping the silver ball down the chute so it lands in the dump truck. He's learning cause and effect when the ball rolls and also honing fine motor skills as he snaps the pieces into place, which makes this pick a win-win. Ages 3+, $50.

Tabletop Fruit Stand by Ever Earth/Maxim Enterprise

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Tabletop Fruit Stand by Ever Earth/Maxim Enterprise

Fresh pears for sale! Plus bananas, oranges, apples and such, all adorably stacked in this handsome wooden fruit stand. Lots of hands-on learning takes place in a produce shop (counting, sorting, colors), as well as pretend play (buying, selling, even "tasting"!). Two small chalkboards are ready to display the day's specials, and the striped awning shades your young shopkeeper's wares. We also love how quick it is to build this item-just seven screws hold the pieces in place. Ages 3+, $80.

Thomas & Friends Wooden Railway Up and Around Sodor Adventure Tower

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Thomas & Friends Wooden Railway Up and Around Sodor Adventure Tower

Most train sets end up spread all over the living room or require a big table to accommodate the tracks. But this smart one from good ol' Thomas has a compact vertical design that can easily rest on a bookcase or coffee table. A magnetic crane, cargo car and that familiar blue engine are included, along with tracks, a tunnel and easy-to-assemble walls. And the three roomy levels mean there's room for a little brother to take a turn as conductor and help push the cars. Ages 3+, $200.

Trix Track Safari Track by Wonderworld

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Trix Track Safari Track by Wonderworld

The allure of a marble run is watching the tiny ball wend its way down, down the track, around the curves, dropping through holes until it arrives at the final destination-a little cup or bowl. This version is a takeoff on the classic, but with a wild twist: Safari creatures are incorporated into the run, including a giraffe, an elephant and crocodile "steps." Multiple track designs can be built and little blocks can be added-and then toppled-at the end for an extra laugh. Ages 3+, $70.

Barbie Entrepreneur by Mattel

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Barbie Entrepreneur by Mattel

We at Working Mother

are always behind woman entrepreneurs-and this Barbie is no exception! She's been a nurse, an Olympian and a dentist-and she's also taught aerobics, ministered to pets and run for President. But Barbie's latest endeavor is definitely the most creative-and contemporary: She's starting her own business. Her chic dress and black patent pumps channel Audrey Hepburn, yet her briefcase is filled with the most modern of gadgets, including an iPhone and iPad.

Working Mother

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

The Big Creativity in a Can by Faber-Castell

Another rainy day? Your kids just might pray for wet weather for a chance to break into this can of awesomeness. Snip the textured and patterned paper into puppets, monsters, animals and more, and then decorate with pom-poms, feathers, googly eyes and foam shapes. Add in the glue, clay and colorful Popsicle sticks and the possibilities increase exponentially. We plan to grab this kit for our own kids as well as a couple of extras to stash in the closet for upcoming spring and summer birthdays. Ages 4+, $20.

Teeter Popper by Fat Brain Toys

Photo by: Working Mother Editor

Teeter Popper by Fat Brain Toys

We were in stitches imagining our kids on these curvy neon wonders! All three designs have mini suction cups on the bottom that make a satisfying thwock when they're rocked and rolled. Your kiddo can lie inside, sit on top or stand with a foot on either end and hang ten, surfer style. Kids get to use their bodies and experiment with sound and pressure as they move and groove on this way-cool board. Ages 4+, $37.

Images: Working Mother

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Keeping Up with an Active Baby

By Jeana Lee Tahnk

My daughter quickly morphed from a docile, doe-eyed baby who was content on her back, staring at the environment around her, to a crazily active one who is taking advantage of her newfound mobility to get into everything. As soon as she learned how to crawl, she was off and moving, loving her freedom to explore.

Of course, an active baby requires parents to take action:

Babyproofing: This is the most important requirement when it comes to active babies. Any little piece of paper, a loose block or cracker that your older kids dropped on the floor several days ago are prime targets for mouth exploration. Since my baby is roaming the floors of the house right now, I have tasked the older kids with helping clear the floor path for her by making sure they pick up after themselves.

Speedy diaper-changing skills: The ability to crawl and the inability to lie still seem to go hand-in-hand at this stage. There's so much to explore now, it's understandable that babies have no desire to be on a changing table anymore. Swift movements and deft skills are the name of the game when it comes to diaper changes. Just make sure the diaper is on securely so it can handle those fast-moving thighs, or use a slip-on diaper for quick changes.

Lots of floor time: Be prepared to get down - and stay - on the floor. Your baby will love having you at eye level and using you as a climbing post/human pacifier. Whenever I am on the floor with my baby, I end up getting drooled on, climbed on and chewed. And I love every minute of it.

Distraction and diversion: While this age is clearly too young for any kind of disciplinary tactics, it's a great time to master the art of distraction. My baby's room has a floor lamp that admittedly is not the most baby-friendly. But whenever she heads toward it, I try to distract her and offer something else that's equally fascinating. This is also a good time to introduce the words, "careful" and "not safe."

A more relaxed attitude: If you like everything in its place and are a stickler for organization, this might be the time to let go a little. Babies are going to take all the magazines out of the special holder, they're going to "rearrange" the cabinet holding the plastic containers and aren't generally the best at keeping things organized. It's a short-lived phase ("short-lived" meaning a few years), but soon enough your magazines will be back in their rack.

The minute a baby becomes active, it opens up a whole new world for her and everyone else around her. The No. 1 priority is to make sure she's safe; after that, it's nonstop fun all the way.


Read More by Jeana Lee Tahnk

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Raising a Baby or Toddler in the Digital Age

By Jeana Lee Tahnk

The environment our babies are growing up in now is so different than it was 10 or even five years ago. It makes me sound old to be reminiscing about "the simpler times back then," but in some ways, life was easier without all the technological advances we have access to today.

There are apps for toddlers, electronic toys for babies and homes that are filled to the brim with gadgets. As much of a proponent I am of babies not using technology until at least the age of 2, the reality is that we live in a tech-filled world and it's hard to completely shield them from that.

Our baby lives in a house where her parents check their iPhones and her brother and sister play on a tablet, watch TV and use their gaming devices. She sees a world around her where people can ask their phones a question and get a response or order their TVs to find a particular program.

As someone who has been in the tech industry for a long time, I have seen my fair share of kids' apps. While I don't like the idea of young babies interacting with technology, I do believe technology can provide educational (and entertainment) benefits to older kids.

Why am I hesitant to introduce technology at an early age? In my opinion, what's the rush? Kids are going to live a life full of technological advances, many we can't even begin to fathom. With a future path of gadgetry and gizmos, I'd like to retain as much of the simple life as possible, for as long as possible.

I'd rather read a book with my baby than listen to a narrative on a screen. I'd rather play with blocks instead of tap on squares on a tablet. My baby is happy to gnaw on a rubber spatula and hit it against a bowl. At this age, she doesn't need all the extra bells, whistles, flashing lights and stimulation that can come with technology.

It's impossible to raise her in a world devoid of technology, but until she starts seeking the technology - and until I'm ready to give it to her - the rubber spatula and bowls are just fine for both of us.


Read More by Jeana Lee Tahnk

Keeping Up with an Active Baby

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Baby's First Bath Scary or Sweet?

By Jeana Lee Tahnk

The first time doing anything with a newborn can be an intimidating experience. I remember way back when my first baby was born, I held him gingerly after he was born, worried that I would hurt him if I moved too quickly or didn't hold him the right way.

In those couple days at the hospital, I was so surprised to see how deftly the nurses maneuvered him while they changed his diaper or gave him a bath. They must have sensed I was a first-time parent because I so clearly remember one of them saying, "Honey, he isn't going to break."

Fast-forward to his coming home and I wished I could have brought those nurses with me! One of the things I was most nervous about was that first bath. It can be a nerve-wracking thing, especially in those early weeks when babies are just so little.

Of course, the first bath can't happen until the umbilical cord falls off, but when that moment happens you're free and clear to tub away. With all of my babies, the kitchen sink and the appropriate newborn tub was my first choice for those first baths.

Every time I prepared a bath, it was as though I was a chef prepping for an important meal with all the "ingredients" I'd lay out. The requisite cute hooded towel you got from your baby shower, several additional towels, two washcloths (one for washing and one to drape over the baby's belly to keep warm), tear-free baby shampoo and a picture taker next to me (you have to capture those first bath pictures!).

Is the water too hot? Too cold? Is the baby comfortable? All were constant questions I pondered during every baby's first (and second and third) baths. While bathing baby No. 3 wasn't nearly as intimidating as the first baby, I still wondered how the baby was going to react, worried about the water temperature, hoped he was comfortable and wondered how much longer I had before the screaming kicks in.

Eventually the routine gets easier and those baths become, well, routine. And while the first few times might be a little bit scary for new parents, there really isn't much more sweet than a baby enjoying a bath.


Read More by Jeana Lee Tahnk

Baby Besties: The First Friendship

Party On: Celebrating with a Baby Shower



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Baby Besties: The First Friendship

By Jeana Lee Tahnk

There is nothing quite like seeing two babies interact and check out each other. Whether they stare at each other, pat each other down or just drool together, these first encounters are baby's first step toward making friends.

My first two kids had "insta-friends" thanks to daycare. Being surrounded all day with other adorable droolers and playmates certainly provided them with plenty of stimulation and socialization. We lucked out because many of the friendships my kids formed in daycare are ones they have to this day. I also have the same group of friends that I've had since the first grade. Not to date myself but, wow, that was a long time ago.

Since baby No. 3 doesn't go to daycare, she doesn't have constant access to that peer group, which is why I proactively pursue other opportunities for her to meet other babies. Whether it's through playing with other tots on the playground or attending baby classes for music or gym, she gets socialized in other ways. And let's not forget the undivided attention she gets from her big brother and sister.

The other day, my baby went to an open gym session for babies, where there was another little girl about her age. The two of them were drawn to each other, and it was clear that even babies have a sense of who they can connect with. These two little girls spent about five minutes sitting across from each other, exploring each other's hair and staring at each other's faces. It was beyond adorable and a sure sign that she's found a great friend for future play dates.

Babies also love being out and about. Since day one my baby has loved being outside. There is so much to look at and explore, not to mention the grass and sticks she tries to put in her mouth. Having that outside stimulation and seeing who's swinging next to her in the bucket swing at the playground can be another way to introduce new faces.

If you have friends with little kids, invite them over for play dates and you'll see how much babies enjoy observing the habits of other children. I am always looking for new babies to introduce my daughter to, because even at eight months, you never know how long-lasting a new friendship can be.



Read More by Jeana Lee Tahnk

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Top 10 Reasons Baby Hugs Are the Best

By Charlene O'Hanlon

Whether you're a new mother or a seasoned veteran, hugs from your kids are simply the best. There is nothing like a hug from my children to make me smile, especially if I'm coming off a bad day.

It wasn't long ago my toddler was a squirmy, pudgy baby, rolling around and discovering his toes on a daily basis. And there were those days when teething made him a cranky, crying puddle of drool-and I, too, became cranky and weepy because there was nothing I could do to help his pain. Then, one day as I was holding him and trying to help him through the pain, the little guy threw his fat little arms around my neck and squeezed. I don't know if it was conscious action on his part, but the second he did that I relaxed and thought, "This is why we do it."

Baby hugs are awesome for many reasons. Here are my top 10 reasons:

They provide validation: When your little one gives you a hug-whether it's of the two-arm variety or the hair-grabbing, I'm-going-to-eat-your-nose variety-all the hard work and effort you've put into this job of being a parent is validated. One hug makes okay all the late-night walks to get the little one to sleep, baby food smeared on your shirt and desperate searches for lost pacifiers.

Your baby recognizes you are your child's world: Hugs tell you that your child knows who you are: the person your child relies on to be happy and healthy. Babies can't say, "Thank you," but let's face it, a hug is better.

Drool, wonderful drool: Only parents know the joy that comes with having a shoulder soaking wet from the drool of a baby's hug.

Hugs are free: A child's hug provides moments of sheer parental bliss. They cost nothing, yet do so much for us.

Baby hugs often are unexpected: There is never advance notice with a baby hug-you could be adjusting your little one's shirt and, bam! There's a hug. Guaranteed to make you smile for hours.

Hugs build/reinforce the bond: It's no accident that marriage counselors suggest that couples having issues make time to hug each other daily, to help bring the couple closer and reinforce the marital bond. It's no difference between parents and their children-a daily hug tells both of you how much you care for the other.

It's the best way to say "I love you" without words: But when your child first tells you those three little words ... well, that's a different story altogether.

My blood pressure drops: Even when I've had the worst day ever, hugging my child instantly calms me, and when the little guy initiates the hug, I could stay in my rocking chair holding him for hours.

Hugs recharge my batteries: Just like lowering my blood pressure, hugs from my little guy help me keep going, even on the days when I want to drop from exhaustion.

Hugs make it all worthwhile: Let's face it: Parenting is stressful. Every day is a new challenge. To the uninitiated, a hug from your child may not seem like much of a reward for all the stress, but parents know those hugs are more precious than gold, making every diaper change, every fussy feeding session and every late-night sleeper change worth every second.

Read More by Charlene O'Hanlon

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Techno Parenting: 5 Great Apps for Parents with Babies

By Jeana Lee Tahnk

Back when I was pregnant for the first time, I relied heavily on books and the Internet to gather information about "what to expect," pregnancy symptoms, newborn care and everything you want to know when you're preparing to become a parent for the first time. There was no such thing as a smartphone or apps back then.

How quickly it has moved from nothing to never-ending! In the span of a few short years, there are now hundreds, perhaps thousands, of apps at parents' disposal, chock full of information about every stage of parenting.

Here are a few picks that are great for parents of babies:

Ready, Set, Baby! ($4.99, iOS)

This is the modern day equivalent to all those baby books I read religiously with baby No. 1. Made for today's tech-savvy parents, this app features tons of content, how-to videos, shopping guides and expert recommendations on everything you need to know for baby's first year.

Baby Bundle (Free, iOS)

Created by a pediatrician, Baby Bundle is a great all-encompassing app for so many things, from keeping track of growth, feedings and diaper changes to monitoring the baby and recording health visits and vaccinations. It also contains trusted health advice and a symptom checker

Baby Monitor, (Free, Android)

There are a lot of expensive baby monitors on the market, but if you have two Android phones, you can instantly have a baby monitor on your devices. This eliminates the need to lug around a monitor anytime you travel and it's right on your phone, so you can always keep an eye on your baby.

BabyBook by CandoBaby (Free, iOS)

There are so many milestones during the baby's first year, it's important to record them to treasure forever. BabyBook offers built-in templates for you to simply plug in pictures and edit text as necessary, for a seamless and easy way to create that memory book. You can also get the book printed as a forever keepsake.

White Noise Baby (Free, Android)

Babies love to hear white noise because it reminds them of the time they spent in the womb. And anything to help them sleep better is worth checking out. White Noise Baby also features other sounds including heartbeat, water, hair dryer and vacuum cleaner to help babies achieve that deep slumber.

There are thousands of great apps for parents to choose from, but these five are great for covering the basics of life with a baby.


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Join today and receive 50 free points! You'll also start earning Reward Points for all of your purchases. Points earned can be used towards gift cards, free diapers and wipes, and so much more!

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Rewards History
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What are Rewards Codes?

15-character codes on participating Huggies® Products that you can use to earn Huggies® Rewards points!

Where can I find them?

BAG OF DIAPERS

BOX OF DIAPERS/WIPES

REFILL BAG OF WIPES

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What are Rewards Offer Codes?

Offer Codes are limited-time offers to earn bonus points. They're 8 digits long and must be submitted at the same time as a participating product Rewards Code.

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